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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dixon in Lee County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Reagan Home

 
 
Reagan Home Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Light, November 17, 2000
1. Reagan Home Marker
Inscription.  The Reagan family—Jack, Nelle, and their two sons, Neil (age 12) and Ronald (age 9), moved to Dixon and into this house on December 6, 1920. The boys attended school at South Side School, later known as South Central School, just four blocks north on Hennepin Avenue. The family lived in this house for three years. This home has been designated as a historical landmark by the Dixon Historical Preservation Commission.
 
Erected 1999 by Dixon Historical Preservation Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EducationSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #40 Ronald Reagan series list. A significant historical date for this entry is December 6, 1920.
 
Location. 41° 50.168′ N, 89° 28.839′ W. Marker is in Dixon, Illinois, in Lee County. Marker is on Reagan Way / South Hennepin Avenue south of West 9th Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 816 S Hennepin Ave, Dixon IL 61021, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Reagan Way (within shouting distance of this marker); Dixon Historic Center
Reagan Home image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Light, November 17, 2000
2. Reagan Home
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(approx. ¼ mile away); Dixon Public Library (approx. 0.4 miles away); Ward T. Miller (approx. 0.4 miles away); Our Fathers — Veterans of 1861-1865 (approx. 0.4 miles away); Lincoln Supports Fremont for President (approx. 0.4 miles away); First Christian Church (approx. half a mile away); The Wings of Peace and Freedom (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dixon.
 
Reagan's Boyhood Home image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner, September 24, 2014
3. Reagan's Boyhood Home
Ronald Reagan image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
4. Ronald Reagan
This 1989 portrait of Ronald Reagan by Henry Casselli, Jr. hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“When ex-California governor Ronald Reagan began his presidency in 1981, his warmth and skill in handling the media had already planted the seeds of his reputation as the ‘great communicator.’ More significant, however, was how those traits were made to work on behalf of his conservative agenda. By the end of his second term, despite widespread concern over budget deficits and several administration scandals, Reagan's presidency had wrought many significant changes. Under his leadership, the nation had undergone major tax reforms, witnessed a significant easing of relations with the Communist world, and experienced a sharp upturn in prosperity. Reagan left office enjoying a popularity that only a few of his outgoing predecessors had ever experienced.

This portrait is based on some thirty studies that artist Henry Casselli made of Reagan over four days at the White House in late 1988. Commissioned with the National Portrait Gallery in mind, the finished picture arrived at the White House the following January for presidential inspection. When Reagan saw it he exclaimed, ‘Yep! That's the old buckaroo.’” — National Portrait Gallery
Reagan Home image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Light, November 17, 2000
5. Reagan Home
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 9, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. This page has been viewed 1,642 times since then and 6 times this year. Last updated on October 24, 2014, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 9, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.   3. submitted on October 24, 2014, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   4. submitted on September 22, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5. submitted on July 11, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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May. 19, 2022