Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sonoma in Sonoma County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Buena Vista Winery and Vineyards

 
 
Buena Vista Winery and Vineyards Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, February 5, 2015
1. Buena Vista Winery and Vineyards Marker
Inscription.  Birthplace of California wine. Founded in 1857 by Colonel Agoston Haraszthy, father of state’s wine industry. Limestone tunnels were dug into the hillside and vineyards were also established. Haraszthy toured Europe in 1861 to gather the cuttings that developed California’s wine industry.
 
Erected 1980 by State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with Buena Vista Winery and Vineyards. (Marker Number 392.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureIndustry & Commerce. In addition, it is included in the California Historical Landmarks, and the Chinese Heritage Sites of the American West series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1857.
 
Location. 38° 17.973′ N, 122° 25.359′ W. Marker is near Sonoma, California, in Sonoma County. Marker can be reached from Old Winery Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 18000 Old Winery Road, Sonoma CA 95476, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Buena Vista Press House (a few steps from this marker); Harazthy Villa (approx. 0.2
Buena Vista Winery and Vineyards Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, February 5, 2015
2. Buena Vista Winery and Vineyards Marker
The marker is to the right of the entrance.
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miles away); Samuele Sebastiani Vineyard and Winery (approx. 1½ miles away); Trinity Episcopal Church (approx. 1.7 miles away); Ray Adobe (approx. 1.7 miles away); The Sonoma Community Center (approx. 1.7 miles away); Sonoma Brewing Company (approx. 1.7 miles away); Vella Cheese Factory (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sonoma.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Entire Story - Buena Vista Winery. Excerpt:
[Agoston Haraszthy] constructed the first gravity-flow winery in California and in the surrounding hills, he excavated Sonoma's first caves for aging and storing wine with the aide of Chinese laborers, whose virtues he extolled. He is also credited with being the first to experiment with Redwood barrels for aging and fermenting, an adaptation of traditional European oak barrels that employed the resources of the local forests.
(Submitted on February 9, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 

2. Entry in APA Chinese Heritage Sites of the American West. Excerpt:
Agoston Haraszthy, an immigrant from Europe founded the Buena Vista Winery
Buena Vista Winery image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, February 5, 2015
3. Buena Vista Winery
in 1857. Haraszthy proclaimed himself “The Count” of Buena Vista. Coming from Europe, he was outspoken about the rights of Chinese workers. He continued to employ the Chinese even after threats were made against his life; some so relentless he began carrying a firearm on his hip at all times. Though an innovator and a man ahead of his time, the Chinese he employed were still paid much less than the average white man: $8 per month to the White laborers $30. Even a man as progressive as Haraszthy benefited from the unequal pay between White and Chinese laborers.
(Submitted on May 2, 2020.) 
 
Agoston Haraszthy plaque image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, February 5, 2015
4. Agoston Haraszthy plaque
Agoston Haraszthy image. Click for full size.
5. Agoston Haraszthy
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 2, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 9, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 267 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 9, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 11, 2021