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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ohsweken in Brant County, Ontario — Central Canada
 

The Six Nations

 
 
The Six Nations Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 11, 2014
1. The Six Nations Marker
Inscription.  English:
Commemorating the loyal services and unswerving fidelity of the Six Nations of Iroquois Indians to the British Empire in the Seven Years War, 1755 - 1763, the War of the American Revolution, 1775 - 1783, and in the defence of Upper Canada in 1812 - 1814 and in 1837- 38.

French:
Par leurs loyaux services et leur fidélité inébranlable durant la guerre de Sept ans, 1755-1763, la guerre de la Révolution américaine, 1775-1783 et dans la défense du Haut-Canada, 1812-1814 et en 1837-38, les Six Nations Iroquoises ont bien mérité de l'empire britannique.
 
Erected 1934 by Historic Sites and Monument Board of Canada/Commission de lieux et monuments historique du Canada.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansWar of 1812War, French and IndianWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Canada, Historic Sites and Monuments Board series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1755.
 
Location. 43° 4.156′ N, 80° 
The Six Nations Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 11, 2014
2. The Six Nations Marker
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7.103′ W. Marker is in Ohsweken, Ontario, in Brant County. Marker can be reached from 4th Line close to Chiefswood Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1799 4th Line, Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0, Canada. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ahyouwaeghs - John Brant (a few steps from this marker); The Six Nations War Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Thayendanega (Joseph Brant) (a few steps from this marker); Cogwagee • Tom Longboat (within shouting distance of this marker); Tomb of THAYENDANEGEA (approx. 11.3 kilometers away); Her Majesty’s Chapel of the Mohawks (approx. 11.3 kilometers away); St. Paul’s 1785 (approx. 11.3 kilometers away); Mohawk Village (approx. 11.3 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ohsweken.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located in Six Nations Veteran's Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Iroquois - Wikipedia. The Iroquois, also known as the Haudenosaunee, are a historically powerful and important northeast Native American confederacy. They were known during the colonial years to the French as the "Iroquois League" and later as the "Iroquois Confederacy", and to the English as the "Five Nations" (before 1722) and later as the "Six Nations", comprising the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora nations... In 2010, more than 45,000 enrolled Six Nations people lived in Canada, and about 80,000 in the United
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States.
(Submitted on May 25, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 

2. The Six Nations Confederacy During the American Revolution - National Park Service. The Treaty of Paris bought the war to an end in 1783. In this treaty however, neither the English nor the Americans had made provisions for their Six Nations allies. The Confederacy was forced to sign a separate treaty with the United States in 1784. This treaty was negotiated and signed at the ruinous Fort Stanwix, and resulted in the English allied Confederacy members giving up significant amounts of their traditional lands... (Submitted on May 25, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 22, 2017. It was originally submitted on May 25, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 333 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 25, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Jan. 26, 2022