Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Diego in San Diego County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Harbor Lights

 
 
Harbor Lights Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 30, 2015
1. Harbor Lights Marker
Inscription.  No lighthouse kept vigil over the harbor four centuries ago when Cabrillo sailed into the bay. There were no channel buoys, fog horns, or local charts to guide mariners safely to anchor. Today, however, the Coast Guard and Port of San Diego provide a full range of navigational aids for the many military, commercial, and privately owned vessels that use the harbor.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: CommunicationsWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Lighthouses series list.
 
Location. 32° 40.419′ N, 117° 14.525′ W. Marker is in San Diego, California, in San Diego County. Marker can be reached from Cabrillo Memorial Drive. At the Visitors' Center, Cabrillo National Monument. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Diego CA 92106, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Army Radio Station (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Army Radio Station (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Civilian Conservation Corps (about 500 feet away); Point Loma Lighthouse
Harbor Lights Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Adam Margolis, March 18, 2018
2. Harbor Lights Marker
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(about 500 feet away); Old Point Loma Lighthouse (about 600 feet away); Point Loma - The Early Years (about 600 feet away); The Bayside Trail (about 600 feet away); The Heart and Soul of Lighthouses (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Diego.
 
Also see . . .  New Point Loma Lighthouse. (PDF) Reprinted from The Keeper's Log — Winter 2002. (Submitted on July 2, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
1891 Point Loma Lighthouse image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 30, 2015
3. 1891 Point Loma Lighthouse
The new Point Loma Lighthouse built in 1891 stands down near the coast on the tip of the peninsula. It replaced the original 1855 lighthouse on the hill to your right. The modernized structure sends out a brilliant white beam that flashes every 15 seconds, and is equipped with a powerful foghorn that can be heard by ships up to 3 miles out (4.8km). You can get a good view of the lighthouse from the whale overlook.
Close-up of image on marker
Channel Marker Buoy image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 30, 2015
4. Channel Marker Buoy
Close-up of image on marker
Zuniga Jetty image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 30, 2015
5. Zuniga Jetty
The Zuniga Jetty, a submerged stone wall built by the Army Corps of Engineers in 1904, protects the far side of the channel from currents and sediment deposits. A series of quick flashing white lights mark the mile long jetty. A horn attached to the end of the jetty can be heard sounding a one-second blast every ten seconds.
Close-up of image on marker
Jetty Foghorn image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 30, 2015
6. Jetty Foghorn
Close-up of image on marker
New Point Loma Lighthouse image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 30, 2015
7. New Point Loma Lighthouse
New Point Loma Lighthouse image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 30, 2015
8. New Point Loma Lighthouse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 24, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 2, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 312 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 2, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2. submitted on February 16, 2022, by Adam Margolis of Mission Viejo, California.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on July 2, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 3, 2022