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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Berlin in Worcester County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Olde Sinepuxent

 
 
Olde Sinepuxent Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Busta-Peck, June 21, 2008
1. Olde Sinepuxent Marker
Inscription.  Ever since explorer Giovanna da Verrazzano sailed through Sinepuxent Bay in 1524, human activty along these waters has helped shape Assateague's history. Except for intriguing place names on local maps, almost all traces of these historic events have been erased by the passage of time and the island's shifting sands.

Great Egging Island
Recreational activities in the late 1800s included a trip to the coast to go "eggin'," and Great and Little Egging Islands quickly became popular sites. Special picnics were organized for the sole purpose of collecting gull, willet, and other shorebird eggs, which were considered great delicacies. Bird protections laws eventually brought egging activities to an end.

Ferry Landing
Ferry service began at Assateague's far north end after the 1933 hurricane separated the island from Ocean City. Eventually the service moved to this ferry landing area where a deep channel was dug through the marsh. Ferries were used heavily in the 1950s when developers brought prospective buyers to the island. Ferry service ended when the bridge was built in 1964.

Sinepuxent
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Inlet

Of Assateague's 11 recorded historic inlets, Sinepuxent Inlet was the largest and most commercially valuable. Located just to the south of the Ferry Landing, old maps suggest that it closed and reopened many times in the 18th and 19th centuries. Large ships used this important waterway to bring goods to and form bay communities. Colonists guarded Sinepuxent Inlet with militia during the Revolutionary War.

Baltimore Saltworks
Salt, once an indispensable food preserver, was extremely important during the Revolutionary War. When the British cut off salt supplies, local towns relied heavily on coastal operations like Baltimore Saltworks and other small saltworks on Assateague. To make a bushel of salt, 350-400 gallons of sea water were either evaporated in clay-lined pits or boiled in wrought iron pans.
 
Erected by Assateague Island National Seashore.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraExplorationSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary. A significant historical year for this entry is 1524.
 
Location. 38° 12.042′ N, 75° 9.776′ W. Marker is near Berlin, Maryland, in Worcester County. Marker can be reached from Bayberry Drive (Maryland Route 611). Marker is located near the Old Ferry Landing, in
Olde Sinepuxent Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Busta-Peck, June 21, 2008
2. Olde Sinepuxent Marker
Two markers describing wildlife can be seen to the left.
Assateague Island National Seashore. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Berlin MD 21811, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Saving Lives (approx. 0.4 miles away); Native Americans (approx. 0.4 miles away); Keep Them Safe / Keep Them Wild (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Keep Them Safe / Keep Them Wild (approx. ¾ mile away); Baltimore Boulevard (approx. 0.8 miles away); Swindler Park (approx. 2.7 miles away); "Genesar" (approx. 2.7 miles away); Wild and Free (approx. 2.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Berlin.
 
Sinepuxent Bay, as seen from the marker. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Busta-Peck, June 21, 2008
3. Sinepuxent Bay, as seen from the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 12, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 28, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,910 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 28, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.

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Apr. 18, 2024