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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clarksville in Montgomery County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Building Fort Sevier (Defiance)

 
 
Building Fort Sevier (Defiance) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
1. Building Fort Sevier (Defiance) Marker
Inscription.  Throughout history forts have been built to protect important sites. Civil War-era forts were generally masonry for seacoast fortifications. Earthen forts were predominant at inland locations, including Forts Donelson and Sevier (Defiance Fort Sevier's earthen walls, called parapets, were designed to protect its garrison from enemy fire. Ditches outside the parapets would slow assaulting troops. The covered way, a large trench with a wooden and dirt roof, protected troops carrying ammunition. The thickly protected magazine stored the ammunition Senior Confederate military engineer Jeremy Gilmer sited Fort Sevier to protect the bend in the Cumberland River. Gilmer hired civilian engineer Edward Sayers to build the fort. Local slaves were leased, and Confederate soldiers were ordered to build the fort. Continuous labor shortages caused construction to lag. Factors made this an untenable fort. The hill's height required a downward angle that was too steep for the cannons to effectively fire upon that portion of the river. The shape of the fort and the structural core did not comply with military engineering guidelines.
Building Fort Sevier (Defiance) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, March 10, 2021
2. Building Fort Sevier (Defiance) Marker
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Earthen forts were typically built with a core of stacked logs with dirt packed on top, but archeological evidence shows Fort Sevier was not built in this manner. Fort Sevier and Fort Clark were initially garrisoned by the Montgomery Heavy Artillery, C.S.A. Clarksville's forts were not as heavily armed as Fort Donelson. They were abandoned after Fort Donelson's capture under the belief they could not stop the Union advance.
 
Erected 2008 by the City of Clarksville.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 36° 32.471′ N, 87° 22.409′ W. Marker is in Clarksville, Tennessee, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from A Street, 0.1 miles Walker Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 120 Duncan Street, Clarksville TN 37042, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Life as a Garrisoned Union Soldier (within shouting distance of this marker); Freedmen's Camp and the USCT (within shouting distance of this marker); Forts Versus Ironclads (within shouting distance of this marker); Bringing the War to Clarksville (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Defiance Interpretive Center (within shouting distance
Marker and remnants of earth works. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
3. Marker and remnants of earth works.
of this marker); Fort Defiance (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Defiance (about 300 feet away); Tobacco Trade and the Rivers (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clarksville.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Defiance website. (Submitted on January 3, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Fort Defiance Interpretive Center entrance sign. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
4. Fort Defiance Interpretive Center entrance sign.
Part of the Fort Defiance Pedestrian Trail. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 31, 2015
5. Part of the Fort Defiance Pedestrian Trail.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 3, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 276 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 3, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   2. submitted on May 10, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on January 3, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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Sep. 27, 2021