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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pliny in Mason County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

General McCausland

 
 
General McCausland Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 13, 2015
1. General McCausland Marker
Inscription.  Home of General John McCausland, 1836–1927, one of the last officers of the general staff of the Confederate Army. He served in Pennsylvania, the Virginias, and Maryland. He led Lomax’s cavalry against Sheridan in Valley Campaign.
 
Erected 1974 by West Virginia Department of Archives and History.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Archives and History series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1927.
 
Location. 38° 39.415′ N, 81° 58.154′ W. Marker is near Pliny, West Virginia, in Mason County. Marker is on Kanawha Valley Road (U.S. 35) south of Local Road 78. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fraziers Bottom WV 25082, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Atkenson’s Gate (approx. 1.1 miles away); Buffalo Presbyterian Church (approx. 2.8 miles away); Buffalo Academy (approx. 2.8 miles away); “Lawnvale” / “Coin” Harvey (approx.
General McCausland Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 13, 2015
2. General McCausland Marker
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2.8 miles away); Historic Town of Buffalo (approx. 2.8 miles away); Raiders in Buffalo (approx. 2.8 miles away); Indian Village / Excavations (approx. 5 miles away); Red House (approx. 8.7 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Life of Brigadier General John McCausland. 1943 article in West Virginia History Journal by James Earl Brown. “McCausland’s brigade was a reserve for that of Colonel William E. Baldwin, but when the enemy pressed to his right, McCausland at once moved to Baldwin's support and engaged the enemy in thick undergrowth and in a rough and rolling country. When his firing had checked McClernand, McCausland ordered a charge that routed the enemy for two miles and he halted only at the order of General Pillow. As planned, the entire besieged army could have escaped through this opening in the Union lines, but General Pillow intervened and caused Floyd to change the orders. The Thirty-sixth Virginia under command of McCausland lost fourteen killed and forty-six wounded. It captured one field gun and 200 Enfield rifles. McCausland said his men behaved gallantly.” (Submitted on July 18, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.) 
 
Home of General McCausland image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 13, 2015
3. Home of General McCausland
This view is from the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on July 18, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 614 times since then and 34 times this year. Last updated on February 13, 2016, by Irvin Saunders of Gallipolis, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 18, 2015, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 20, 2021