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Killingly in Windham County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Killingly

 
 
Killingly Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, March 27, 2016
1. Killingly Marker
Inscription.  
Front
Settled in 1700 and incorporated in 1708, Killingly was the forty-second town established in Connecticut.
In 1653, the second John Winthrop obtained a grant of a large tract of land formerly held by the Quinebaug Indian tribe and known as the Quinebaug (long pond) Country. In May, 1708 the General Assembly granted the privileges of a town and defined its boundaries. The selection of a name for the town was referred to Governor Saltonstall, whose ancestral manorial possessions lay in Killanslie and Pontefract, Yorkshire. Hence “Killingly”, formerly spelled Kellingly was taken from this part of England. The early name of Killingly was Aspinock, even after the authorization of the town by the Connecticut General Assembly, and may have been taken the Indian word “aucks” or “ock” (the place where) and the name of an early English settler, Lieutenant Aspinwell.

Back
The home of Mary Kies, first woman to receive a patent from the United States Patent Office.
Killingly is also the birthplace of William Torrey Harris and Sidney Percy Marland, Jr., the fourth
Killingly Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, March 27, 2016
2. Killingly Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
and nineteenth United States Commissioners of Education.
Charles Lewis Tiffany was born and lived here before moving to New York City where, in 1837, in partnership with John B. Young, also of Killingly, he opened a stationer’s store on Broadway. That enterprise later became the noted jewelry firm Tiffany & Company.
During the 1830’s, Killingly was the largest producer of cotton goods in Connecticut and a century later was the curtain capital of the world. Today Killingly is a community of diversified industries and is the second largest town in both area and population in Windham County.
 
Erected 1978 by the Town of Killingly, the Killingly American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, and the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical month for this entry is May 1708.
 
Location. 41° 48.366′ N, 71° 52.949′ W. Marker is in Killingly, Connecticut, in Windham County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Connecticut Route 12) and Academy Street, on the right when traveling north on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Danielson CT 06239, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Killingly World War II Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Killingly Civil War Monument
Killingly Town Hall image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, March 27, 2016
3. Killingly Town Hall
The Town Hall is to the right of the marker. It is located in Danielson, which is a borough of Killingly. Danielson has 2 historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Christopher Lee Hoskins (approx. 0.2 miles away); World War I Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away); Israel Putnam (approx. 3.7 miles away); Brooklyn (approx. 3.7 miles away); Israel Putnam Monument (approx. 3.7 miles away); Brooklyn Civil War Monument (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Killingly.
 
Also see . . .
1. An overview of Killingly, CT. (Submitted on March 28, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. History of Killingly. (Submitted on March 28, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. visiting Killingly. (Submitted on March 28, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
4. The Town of Killingly. (Submitted on March 28, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on March 28, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 441 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 28, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Oct. 4, 2022