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Princeton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Betsey Stockton

Women’s Heritage Trail

 

— Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church —

 
Betsey Stockton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, May 5, 2016
1. Betsey Stockton Marker
Inscription.  Betsey Stockton (1798-1865) began life as a slave for the prominent Stockton family in Princeton. When she gained her freedom at the age of 20, she became a missionary, traveling to Hawaii (Sandwich Islands), Canada and Philadelphia, teaching school and sometimes serving as an unofficial nurse. Stockton returned to Princeton in 1835, living in a small house on Witherspoon Street, in a primarily African-American neighborhood. She spent the rest of her life working to enrich the lives of members of her local community. Betsey was one of the first members of the Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church, originally called the First Presbyterian Church of Colour in Princeton. Betsey Stockton taught children in a small building on Witherspoon Street. She continued to teach the children when the Witherspoon School for Colored Children was established. When Betsey Stockton died in Princeton at the age of 67, she was memorialized by former students who donated a stained glass window in her honor to the church.

“Of African blood and born in slavery she became fitted by education and divine grace for life of great usefulness, for many years

Betsey Stockton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, May 5, 2016
2. Betsey Stockton Marker
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was a valued missionary at the Sandwich Islands in the family of Rev. C. S. Stewart, and afterwards till her death, a popular and able Principal of Public schools in Philadelphia and Princeton honored and beloved by a large circle of Christian Friends.”

Inscription on Ms. Stockton’s tombstone.

(Inscription in the two boxes on the right) (Top box)
The Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church was originally known as the First Presbyterian Church of Colour in Princeton and it was at this site that Elizabeth “Betsey” Stockton began a Sabbath School for African-American children.

(Bottom box)
The New Jersey Women’s Heritage Trail highlights a collection of historic sites located around the state that represent the significant contributions women made to the history of our state. The Heritage Trail brings to life the vital role of women in New Jersey’s past and present.
 
Erected by New Jersey Historic Trust-Historic Preservation Office.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansChurches & ReligionEducationWomen. In addition, it is included in the New Jersey Women’s Heritage Trail series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1835.
 
Location. 40° 21.189′ N, 74° 39.683′ 

Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, May 5, 2016
3. Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church
W. Marker is in Princeton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker is on Witherspoon Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton NJ 08542, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rev. John Witherspoon (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Paul Robeson (about 500 feet away); Princeton’s Flag Man (about 500 feet away); Aaron Burr (about 500 feet away); March of the Mill Children (approx. ¼ mile away); 250th Anniversary of Princeton University (approx. ¼ mile away); Nassau Inn – 1756 - 1937 (approx. ¼ mile away); The First Presbyterian Church of Princeton (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Princeton.
 
Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, May 5, 2016
4. Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on May 22, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 338 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 22, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Oct. 2, 2022