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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Emmitsburg in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gen. John F. Reynolds

"Dear Kate"

 

— Gettysburg Campaign —

 
Gen. John F. Reynolds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 22, 2008
1. Gen. John F. Reynolds Marker
Inscription.  On the last day of June 1863, Emmitsburg became a Union army supply base. Union Gen. John F. Reynolds, commanding the left wing of the Army of the Potomac (I, III, and XI Corps), arrived as I Corps came into Emmitsburg to obtain needed supplies, camp, and muster to receive pay before marching five miles north across the Mason-Dixon line to Marsh Creek. On July 1, Reynolds traveled the Emmitsburg Road toward Gettysburg. Early on that first day of battle, a sharpshooter killed him.

This place has another connection to Reynolds after he was killed. Three years earlier, he met and fell in love with Cathrine Mary (Kate) Hewit. They had sailed together from San Francisco to New York and had exchanged rings. She received his West Point ring, and he a gold ring inscribed "Dear Kate." They planned to announce their engagement at a family party on July 8. Instead, Reynolds' family members learned about his fiancée when she arrived to view his body and they discovered on him both a locket and the inscribed ring. Kate had promised Reynolds that if he was killed she would enter religious life. On March 17, 1864, she joined the Daughters of Charity.
Map in the Header of the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 22, 2008
2. Map in the Header of the Marker
She completed her initial training here at Saint Joseph's Central House and went on mission to Albany, N.Y. She was reported to be in poor health in subsequent years, withdrew from the community in 1868 before pronouncing her vows, and disappeared from the historical records.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails series list.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 39° 41.934′ N, 77° 19.646′ W. Marker was in Emmitsburg, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker could be reached from South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north. Located in the parking lot for the National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 333 South Seton Avenue, Emmitsburg MD 21727, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. St. Joseph's Valley Camp (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Gen. John F. Reynolds (a few steps from this marker); Daughters of Charity (a few steps from this marker); The First Statue of Mother Seton Erected in the United States (within shouting distance of this marker);
Civil War Trails Marker Cluster image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Civil War Trails Marker Cluster
In the parking lot for the National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. From left to right Daughters of Charity, St. Joseph's Valley Camp, and General John F. Reynolds.
The Stone House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Bells of St. Joseph's Valley (about 700 feet away); Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul of New York (about 700 feet away); Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton (1774-1821) (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Emmitsburg.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a painting of St. Joseph's Chapel built in 1841. In the center is a photo of Sister nurses of various congregations. On the right is a portrait of Gen. Reynolds. A map showing other Civil War Trails sites in the area is in the upper left header of the marker.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. This marker has been replaced by the linked marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Gen. John F. Reynolds. Short biography of General Reynolds. Considered for the post of commander of the Army of the Potomac, Reynolds demanded more latitude than previously allowed to prosecute the war. In the end, the position was given to General Meade. (Submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. John F. Reynolds. Living historian and biographer Michael A. Riley. (Submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Major Gen. John F. Reynolds image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Major Gen. John F. Reynolds
Civil War Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 23, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,048 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on November 15, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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Feb. 28, 2021