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Historic District - South in Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home

 
 
Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, July 2008
1. Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home Marker
Inscription.  
Mary Flannery O'Connor, novelist and short story writer, was born in Savannah March 25, 1925. She grew up in this house and in later years she referred to it simply as "the house I was raised in." She lived here until 1938, attending church at the Cathedral across Lafayette Square and school at St. Vincent's Grammar School, then facing the square between Harris and Macon Streets. Flannery O'Connor thrice won the O. Henry award for best short story of the year. Her collected stories won the National Book Award in 1972. She died in 1964 at age 39.
 
Erected 1991 by Georgia Historic Marker. (Marker Number 025-101.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicWomen. In addition, it is included in the Georgia Historical Society series list. A significant historical date for this entry is March 25, 1930.
 
Location. 32° 4.352′ N, 81° 5.486′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. It is in the Historic District - South. Marker is at the intersection of East Charlton Street and Abercorn Street
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, on the right when traveling east on East Charlton Street. Located just off Lafayette Square. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 207 East Charlton St, Savannah GA 31401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Marist Place (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary Musgrove (within shouting distance of this marker); Andrew Low House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Colonial Dames House (about 300 feet away); Cathedral of St. John the Baptist (about 300 feet away); Colonial Group, Inc. (about 400 feet away); First Girl Scout Headquarters in America (about 400 feet away); "Jingle Bells" (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Also see . . .  Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964). New Georgia Encyclopedia website entry (Submitted on July 24, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home Marker at 207 E. Charlton St. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home Marker at 207 E. Charlton St.
Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2009
3. Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home Marker
Flannery O'Connor Grave, Milledgeville, Georgia image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
4. Flannery O'Connor Grave, Milledgeville, Georgia
b. March 25, 1925 d. August 3, 1964 Author, Essayist. Savannah, Georgia born, Mary Flannery O’Connor was the daughter of real estate executive, Edward O’Connor and his socialite wife, Regina Cline. She was raised a Catholic in a Protestant world and would later use this experience for her work, “The Catholic Novelist in the Protestant South.” O’Connor’s father died when she was sixteen, and her mother took her back with her to the Cline’s family’s hometown of Milledgeville, Georgia.
Flannery O'Connor grave image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
5. Flannery O'Connor grave
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 8, 2023. It was originally submitted on July 24, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,842 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 24, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on April 28, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on May 10, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on May 11, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 24, 2024