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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Milwaukee in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

National Soldiers Home

 
 
National Soldiers Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, June 12, 2012
1. National Soldiers Home Marker
Inscription.  The Wisconsin Soldiers’ Home Association was formed in 1864 by a coalition of women’s charitable organizations led by Lydia Hewitt, Hannah Vedder, and Mrs. E. L. Buttrick of Milwaukee. The Association raised funds to endow a hospital where sick and wounded Civil War soldiers could receive medical treatment and long-term domiciliary care. After securing a state appropriation of $5000, the Association staged a spectacular public event known as the Soldiers’ Home Fair, which opened in Milwaukee on June 29, 1865, and raised more than $110,000. the proceeds from the Soldiers’ Home Fair enabled the Association to purchase land and establish a hospital. In 1867, the Association transferred its property and remaining funds to the federal government for the establishment of the National Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch. Dr. Erastus B. Wolcott of Milwaukee, the state’s surgeon general during the Civil War, was appointed by Congress to head the governing board of the Home. In 1869, the noted architect Edward Townsend Mix designed the High Victorian Gothic structure “Old Main,” now known as Building No. 2. The hospital
National Soldiers Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, June 12, 2012
2. National Soldiers Home Marker
was renamed the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Administration Medical Center in 1985.
 
Erected 1989 by Wisconsin State Historical Society. (Marker Number 287.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: MilitaryWar, US CivilWomen. In addition, it is included in the Wisconsin Historical Society series list.
 
Location. 43° 1.216′ N, 87° 58.404′ W. Marker is in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in Milwaukee County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of West National Avenue and South 48th Street. Located on the grounds of the Zablocki Veterans Administration Medical Center, in the parking lot off National Avenue between 47th and 48th Streets. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Milwaukee WI 53295, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Erastus B. Wolcott, M.D (approx. ¼ mile away); The Volunteer-'98 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Lincoln's Gettysburg Address (approx. 0.4 miles away); National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (approx. 0.4 miles away); "Mr. Baseball" (approx. 0.6 miles away); Robin Yount (approx. 0.6 miles away); Menomonee Valley Native Plants (approx. 0.6 miles away); Doug Melvin (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Milwaukee.
 
Related markers.
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Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Milwaukee's Soldiers Home named to national list of endangered places. 2011 article by Mary Louise Schumacher for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “The 90-acre site, with its gracious, park-like grounds, a soldiers’ cemetery, a chapel and a theater, is the only Soldiers Home that remains intact, with its surrounding recuperative village still existing.” (Submitted on July 23, 2011, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin.) 
 
Additional keywords. Veterans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 5, 2018. It was originally submitted on December 10, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 885 times since then and 38 times this year. Last updated on July 13, 2016, by Devon Polzar of Port Washington, Wisconsin. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 20, 2012, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 21, 2020