Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Midway in San Bernardino County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Mojave Road

 
 
Mojave Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, April 24, 2009
1. Mojave Road Marker
Inscription.  Long ago, Mohave Indians used a network of pathways to cross the Mojave Desert. In 1826, American trapper Jedediah Smith used their paths and became the first non-Indian to reach the California coast overland from mid-America. The paths were worked into a military wagon road in 1859. This "Mojave Road" remained a major link between Los Angeles and points east until a railway crossed the desert in 1883.
 
Erected 1988 by State Department of Parks and Recreation, Billy Holcomb Chapter No. 1069 E Clampus Vitus, Bureau of Land Management, and Mojave River Valley Museum Association. (Marker Number 963.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ExplorationNative AmericansRoads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the California Historical Landmarks, the E Clampus Vitus, and the Mojave Road (Old Government Road) series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1826.
 
Location. 35° 1.906′ N, 116° 28.22′ W. Marker is near Midway, California, in San Bernardino County. Marker is on
Mojave Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, April 24, 2009
2. Mojave Road Marker
Also sponsored by: Friends of the Mojave Road (Road Restoration), California Assoc. of Four Wheel Drive Clubs, Inc., California Off-Road Vehicle Association, Inc., Phantom Duck of the Desert Club, Sports Committee District 37 AMA, Inc.
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Interstate 15, 34 miles north of Barstow, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located on the northbound side of Interstate 15 in the Clyde V. Kane Rest Area. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Baker CA 92309, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Cady (approx. 9½ miles away); Harvard Reservoir (approx. 11.7 miles away); Harvard Mill (approx. 11.8 miles away); a different marker also named Camp Cady (approx. 12 miles away); Historic Mojave River Road (approx. 12 miles away).
 
Regarding Mojave Road. Until the coming of the railroads, the chief route across this part of California was the Mojave Road. Heading west from the Colorado River, it passed several vital sources of water necessary for travelers' survival: Pah-Ute Springs, Rock Springs, Marl Springs, Soda Springs and the Mojave River in Afton Canyon. The route continued on through Cajon Pass in the San Bernardino Mountains to Drum Barracks near Los Angeles Harbor. SOURCE: Billy Holcomb Chapter 1069 35th Anniversary Plaque Book by Phillip Holdaway
 
Mojave Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Adam Margolis, December 4, 2015
3. Mojave Road Marker
Mojave Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Adam Margolis, December 4, 2015
4. Mojave Road Marker
The marker's reverse can be seen on the left in this view.
Mojave Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, April 24, 2009
5. Mojave Road Marker
Mojave Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, 2020
6. Mojave Road Marker
Clyde V. Kane Safety Rest Area image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, April 24, 2009
7. Clyde V. Kane Safety Rest Area
Rest Area Sign image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, 2020
8. Rest Area Sign
Commemorative Pin image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, August 7, 2016
9. Commemorative Pin
The Mojave Road
Afton Canyon - Fall 1988
E Clampus Vitus - Billy Holcomb
Friends of the Mojave Road image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, October 9, 1988
10. Friends of the Mojave Road
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 17, 2022. It was originally submitted on December 18, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. This page has been viewed 758 times since then and 34 times this year. Last updated on August 8, 2016, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. Photos:   1. submitted on October 21, 2021, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   2. submitted on December 18, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   3, 4. submitted on February 16, 2022, by Adam Margolis of Mission Viejo, California.   5. submitted on December 24, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   6. submitted on October 27, 2021, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   7. submitted on December 24, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   8. submitted on October 27, 2021, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   9, 10. submitted on August 8, 2016, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 28, 2022