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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Rumney in Grafton County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Geological History of the Polar Caves

 
 
Geological History of the Polar Caves Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 24, 2016
1. Geological History of the Polar Caves Marker
Inscription.  Nearly five billion years ago a great ball of cosmic gasses began to cool and condense forming our solar system. This cooling process continued for 3½ billion years solidifying our planet, Earth, and eventually forming the first continental glaciers.

During the Paleozoic Era warm climates caused glacial melting covering most of the planet with water. Pressures forced great quantities of magma to erupt from the depths of the Earth creating land masses and huge mountains. Over the next 150 million years, weathering and erosion removed thousands of feet of overlaying sediments exposing much of the granite roots of these White Mountains.

In the last million years several glaciers have crept southward from the Arctic further eroding and fracturing the landscape. Fifty thousand years ago the last of these enormous ice sheets rose to a height of more than a mile as it passed over the mountains above you. The force of this ice loosened and deposited granite boulders from the east side of Mt. Haycock forming the prominent cliff above. The top of this peak, being badly fractured when the glacier receeded, cracked and loosened adding
Geological History of the Polar Caves Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 24, 2016
2. Geological History of the Polar Caves Marker
to the boulder deposit at its base.

Thus fourteen to twenty thousand years ago, this random deposit of boulders formed the passages of what today we call The Polar Caves.

Archeozoic Era 3 billion years. Proterozoic Era 1 billion years. Paleozoic Era 320 million years. Mesozoic Era 110 million years. Cenozoic Era 70 million years.
 
Erected by Polar Caves Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Natural Features.
 
Location. 43° 46.832′ N, 71° 46.993′ W. Marker is in Rumney, New Hampshire, in Grafton County. Marker can be reached from Mount Moosilauke Highway (New Hampshire Route 25). Marker is in Polar Caves Park; admission fee required. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 705 New Hampshire 25, Rumney NH 03266, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Park History (a few steps from this marker); The Granite State (within shouting distance of this marker); Smith Bridge (approx. 2.2 miles away); Baker River (approx. 4 miles away); The Common (approx. 5 miles away); Stream Gaging in New Hampshire (approx. 5.1 miles away); Rotary Amphitheater (approx. 5.1 miles away); Samuel Livermore (approx. 5.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rumney.
 
Also see . . .
World's Largest Glacial Granite Boulder - Polar Caves Park image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, August 24, 2016
3. World's Largest Glacial Granite Boulder - Polar Caves Park
Sign reads, "Largest Glacially Deposited Granite Boulder in the world. 110 feet long. 50 feet high. 75 feet thick. estimated weight: 50 million pounds.
 Polar Caves Park. (Submitted on August 27, 2016, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 28, 2016. It was originally submitted on August 27, 2016, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 293 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 27, 2016, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.
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May. 31, 2020