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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Sebastián Bernal in Municipality of Ezequiel Montes, Querétaro, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Friar Junipero de la Vega

 
 
Friar Junipero de la Vega Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 5, 2016
1. Friar Junipero de la Vega Marker
Inscription.
Aquí nacio
Fray Junipero de la Vega
Martir
15 06 1874 · 06 02 1928
Bernal Qro.

English translation:
Here was born
Friar Junipero de la Vega
Martyr
June 15, 1874 · February 6, 1928
Bernal, Querétaro

 
Location. 20° 44.469′ N, 99° 56.5′ W. Marker is in San Sebastián Bernal, Querétaro, in Municipality of Ezequiel Montes. Marker is on Calle Guadalupe Victoria just east of Calle José María Morelos, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Sebastián Bernal, Querétaro 76680, Mexico.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 13 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bernal Magic Town (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); St. Sebastian's Temple (about 90 meters away); Temple of the Virgin of Guadalupe of Ajuchitlán (approx. 9.1 kilometers away); Vero's Handicrafts (approx. 12 kilometers away); Monument to the Mexican Revolution (approx. 12 kilometers away); Temple of San Francisco de Asís (approx. 12 kilometers away); The House of Amado de la Mota (approx. 12 kilometers away); The Parish of San Francisco (approx. 12 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Sebastián Bernal.
 
Regarding Friar Junipero de la Vega.
Friar Junipero de la Vega Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, November 5, 2016
2. Friar Junipero de la Vega Marker
The marker can be seen here to the right of the door, with the dome of the San Sebastián Catholic Church in the distance.
The Cristero War (1926–1929), also known as La Cristiada, was an armed struggle in central-western Mexican states against the secularist, anti-Catholic, and anticlerical policies of the Mexican government. The rebellion was set off by enactment under President Plutarco Elías Calles of a statute to enforce the anticlerical articles of the Mexican Constitution of 1917 (also known as the Calles Law). Calles sought to eliminate the power of the Catholic Church and organizations affiliated with it as an institution, and also suppress popular religious celebration in local communities. The massive, popular rural uprising was tacitly supported by the Church hierarchy and was aided by urban Catholic support. U.S. Ambassador Dwight W. Morrow brokered negotiations between the Calles government and the Catholic Church. The government made concessions, the Church withdrew its support for the Cristero fighters and the conflict ended in 1929. It can be seen as part of the events in the struggle between Church and the Mexican State dating back to the 19th century with the War of Reform, but it can also be interpreted as the last major peasant uprising in Mexico following the end of the military phase of the Mexican Revolution in 1920.

Fray Junípero de La Vega was born in 1874, in Bernal, Querétaro. He was ordained as a priest in 1908. On February 2, 1928, in the midst of the religious
Friar Junipero de la Vega image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, August 5, 2017
3. Friar Junipero de la Vega
This image from the interior of the Temple of San Francisco in Querétaro shows Junipero de la Vega together with Friars José Pérez and Humilde Martínez, two other Franciscan priests killed during the 1928 anti-Catholic movement in Mexico.
persecution of the Cristero War, he was taken prisoner with Friar Humilde Martínez in La Piedad, Michoacán and sentenced to death. On the morning of February 6, 1928, while he was taken on a military train to Zamora, Michoacán he was shot near the train track.
 
Categories. Civil RightsWars, Non-US
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 9, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 5, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 132 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 5, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   3. submitted on August 9, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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