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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Penn Quarter in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mary Church Terrell

 
 
Mary Church Terrell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
1. Mary Church Terrell Marker
Inscription.
Terrell Place is named after
Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954)
Teacher, Writer, Civil Rights Activist


Mary Church Terrell championed equal rights throughout her life — locally, nationally, and internationally.

From 1951 to 1952, at the advanced age of 88, Terrell led a campaign to end segregation at the lunch counter of Hecht's Department Store (Formerly on this site).

This was part of a larger effort by the Coordinating Committee for the Enforcement of the DC Anti-Discrimination Laws to desegregate restaurants throughout Washington. As chair of the Committee. Terrell organized boycotts. picket lines, and sit-ins participating in many herself with a cane in one hand and a protest sign in the other. They convinced over 40 restaurants; including Hecht's lunch counter to stop discriminating. Then on June 8, 1953, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that pre-existing anti-discrimination laws (the “Lost laws” of 1872 and 1873) were still valid, officially ending segregation in restaurants across the city.
 
Location. 38° 53.832′ N, 77° 1.314′ W. Marker is in Penn Quarter, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Seventh Street Northwest and F Street Northwest, on
Mary Church Terrell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
2. Mary Church Terrell Marker
the right when traveling north on Seventh Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 575 Seventh Street Northwest, Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Roots of Freedom and Equality (a few steps from this marker); Discover DC (within shouting distance of this marker); The Daguerre Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Daguerre Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Samuel F. B. Morse (within shouting distance of this marker); General Post Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Patent Office Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Abraham Lincoln Walked Here (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Penn Quarter.
 
Also see . . .  Terrell Place/ Hecht Company Site, African American Heritage Trail. Cultural Tourism (Submitted on January 17, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
Mary Church Terrell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
3. Mary Church Terrell Marker
Mary Church Terrell image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
4. Mary Church Terrell
Close-up of photo on marker
Protesting image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
5. Protesting
Terrell (fourth from left) picketing at nearby Murray's Department Store.
Close-up of photo on marker
Terrell Place<br>Formerly Hecht's Department Store image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
6. Terrell Place
Formerly Hecht's Department Store
Terrell Place<br>575 7th Street NW image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 15, 2017
7. Terrell Place
575 7th Street NW
The Hecht company founded in 1857 moved to this building in 1925. Hecht's was popular with African American Shoppers but their lunch counter remained segregated. After picketing by the Coordinating Committee for the Enforcement of the D.C. Anti-Discrimination Laws headed by Mary Church Terrell, Hecht's opened the entire store to everyone in January 1952. The Building was named Terrell Place in 2004
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 246 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on January 17, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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