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New Albany in Floyd County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

New Albany National Cemetery

 
 
New Albany National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
1. New Albany National Cemetery Marker
Inscription. "Falls of the Ohio" in the Civil War

The towns of Jeffersonville and New Albany, Indiana are located near the falls of the Ohio River across from Louisville, Kentucky. This location made them critical to the Union war effort. Jeffersonville was home to Camp Joe Holt, a recruiting and training center for Indiana and Kentucky troops. In 1864, the U.S. Army completed Jefferson General Hospital, where more than 16,120 Union soldiers were treated.

Jeffersonville also served as a Union supply depot. Southbound ammunition, rations, uniforms, wagons, and other provisions were transported by railroad through Louisville, or shipped down the Ohio River.

All or parts of seven Indiana regiments—five infantry and two cavalry—originated in New Albany. In 1862, the Union army converted several schools and other buildings into hospitals. Dr. Thomas Fry was ordered to New Albany to supervise these facilities. He recommended a cemetery be established near the hospitals.

"Harvest of Death"

Early in 1866, Capt. E.B. Whitman began gathering information in preparation for the reinterment of Union soldiers buried in the Military Division of Tennessee. This huge district included Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

Captain Whitman, later lieutenant
New Albany National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
2. New Albany National Cemetery Marker
colonel, placed newspaper notices seeking locations of Union graves. Citizens, chaplains, soldiers, and officers replied. Whitman made three major expeditions across the region, stopping at hundreds of battlefields and engagement sites. Because of his tireless work, thousands of Union dead were moved to twelve new national cemeteries.

In May 1869, Whitman submitted a detailed summary of this difficult project to the quartermaster general. The report contained sketches and site plans of each cemetery, and data on interments and service affiliations.

National Cemetery

Established in 1862, the first burials at New Albany National Cemetery were Union soldiers who died in local hospitals. By 1869, this 5-acre tract contained 2,807 interments. Most remains were removed from sites along the Ohio River and its tributaries in Indiana, Kentucky, and West Virginia.

The cemetery was soon enclosed by a stone wall, and contained a flagstaff and a rostrum. By the 1870s, a brick Second Empire-style lodge was completed for the superintendent and his family. Two gun monuments flanked a central walkway. The existing rostrum replaced the original one in 1931.

By law, the secretary of war appointed a "meritorious and trustworthy" superintendent to manage the cemetery. John Jay Smith, formerly a sergeant in Company H, 33rd U.S. Infantry,
New Albany National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
3. New Albany National Cemetery Marker
was selected for the position here on August 20, 1868.
 
Erected by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Cemetery Administration.
 
Location. 38° 18.032′ N, 85° 48.35′ W. Marker is in New Albany, Indiana, in Floyd County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Ekin Avenue and Jay Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. The marker is located along the walkway in the cemetery, next to the speaker's rostrum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1943 Ekin Avenue, New Albany IN 47150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Honoring Our Heroes (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named New Albany National Cemetery (about 600 feet away); Division Street School (approx. half a mile away); Memories of Division (approx. half a mile away); Floyd County American Revolution War Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away); Floyd County World Peace Honor Roll (approx. 0.9 miles away); Korean Conflict / Vietnam Conflict - Floyd County (approx. 0.9 miles away); Floyd County Honor Roll & Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Albany.
 
Also see . . .  New Albany National Cemetery.
New Albany National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
4. New Albany National Cemetery
National Cemetery Administration, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (Submitted on January 23, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
New Albany National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
5. New Albany National Cemetery Marker
Cemetery in 1904 image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
6. Cemetery in 1904
New Albany National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
7. New Albany National Cemetery Marker
A wider view, showing its location in the cemetery
Camp Joe Holt image. Click for full size.
By Karl Stelly, December 27, 2016
8. Camp Joe Holt
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 22, 2017, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 296 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 22, 2017, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.   6, 7. submitted on January 24, 2017, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.   8. submitted on January 22, 2017, by Karl Stelly of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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