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Columbus in Muscogee County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Columbus

 
 
Battle of Columbus Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, February 4, 2017
1. Battle of Columbus Monument
Inscription.
South face
At 8:00 P.M. Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865, Federal forces, trying to secure the crossing of the Chattahoochee River, attacked strong defences near Columbus, Georgia. In the face of heavy musketry and artillery fire, the Federals penetrated the Confederate lines, occupied Columbus, and took 1200 prisoners

East face
Federal Forces
Cavalry Corps
Military Division of the
Mississippi
Bvt. Maj. Gen. James H. Wilson,
commanding

4th Division

1st Brigade
3rd Iowa Cavalry
4th Iowa Cavalry
10th Missouri Cavalry

2nd Brigade
1st Ohio Calvary
5th Iowa Cavalry
Battery I, 4th U.S. Artillery

North face
This monument
was erected
October, 1938,
under authority of
an act of Congress
sponsored by
the Historical Society of
Columbus, Georgia,
and approved
April 10th, 1936

West face
Confederate Forces

Maj. Gen. Howell Cobb,
commanding

Georgia Reserves and
Military District of Georgia

District of Alabama

Cavalry
Department of Alabama
Mississippi and East Louisiana

20th Louisiana Infantry

 
Erected 1938 by Historical Society of Columbus, Georgia.
 
Location. 32° 28.361′ N, 84° 59.591′ W. Marker is in Columbus, Georgia, in Muscogee County. Marker is at the intersection of 14th Street and Broadway
Battle of Columbus monument (East face/North Face/West face) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, February 4, 2017
2. Battle of Columbus monument (East face/North Face/West face)
, on the right when traveling west on 14th Street. Touch for map. Located at the northernmost end of Broadway. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14th Street, Columbus GA 31901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Parker Swift I (within shouting distance of this marker); General Benning (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Women’s Riot (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Haiman's Sword Factory (about 600 feet away); Birthplace of Robert Winship Woodruff (approx. 0.2 miles away); High Uptown Historic District / Garrett-Bullock-Delay House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ernest Woodruff / Robert Winship Woodruff (approx. 0.2 miles away); Philip Thomas Schley (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbus.
 
Regarding Battle of Columbus. The Battle of Columbus - also called the Battle of Girard - was the last major land battle of the War Between the States. It took place in Phenix City, Alabama, and Columbus, Georgia, on April 16, 1865.

Although there was an encounter later at Palmito Ranch, Texas, and fighting even later in Alabama (Spanish Fort), the attack on Columbus, Georgia, was the last large-scale battle of the war. It is studied by military officers to this day as a classic example of the confusion caused by night-time fighting.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on the Battle of Columbus (1865). (Submitted on February 8, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Notable EventsWar, US Civil
 
Battle of Columbus Monument in front of Synovus TSYS Campus. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, February 4, 2017
3. Battle of Columbus Monument in front of Synovus TSYS Campus.
James Harrison Wilson / Thomas Howell Cobb image. Click for full size.
By Public Domain (PD-US)
4. James Harrison Wilson / Thomas Howell Cobb
Battle of Columbus Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, February 4, 2017
5. Battle of Columbus Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 8, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 337 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 8, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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