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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum

 
 
Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 25, 2017
1. Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum Marker
Inscription. Dr. Lillie May Carroll Jackson, born in Baltimore on May 25, 1889, was a tireless freedom fighter. As an “American of African descent, “she endured the humiliation of Jim Crow segregation, but did not take this plight sitting down. Using her abiding faith nurtured at Sharp Street United Methodist Church, she believed that “with God, all things are possible.”

As president of the Baltimore branch of the NAACP from 1935 to 1970, Jackson---along with Afro-American Newspaper publisher Carl J. Murphy---organized the community to protest Eastern Shore lynchings, segregated schools, residential restrictive covenants, discriminatory practices of Baltimore retailers and public accommodations establishments, and police brutality.

Jackson made common cause with legal scholars Charles Hamilton Houston and Thurgood Marshall to make the U.S. Constitution a reality. Her leadership resulted in successful litigation of several Supreme Court decisions, including the striking down of racially restrictive covenants in property deeds (1948) and finding segregated public schools unconstitutional (1954).

Jackson was the matriarch of the politically-active Jackson-Mitchell clan that included her son-in-law Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. (known as “the 101st Senator); her daughter Juanita Jackson Mitchell, the first black

Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 25, 2017
2. Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum Marker
woman to practice law in Maryland; her grandson Clarence M. Mitchell III (who at age 21 was the youngest person in the nation to be elected to a state legislature); and U.S. Representative Parren J. Mitchell, the first black U.S. Representative from Maryland.

“The successful struggle for civil rights in Maryland was a defining achievement of this century,” the Baltimore Sun wrote. “Lillie May Carroll Jackson was a key general in that battle.” She died on July 5, 1975.

(Inscription under the image on the right)
Lillie Carroll Jackson “ It is somehow fitting that Lillie May Carroll Jackson, a direct descendant of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, would confront an unjust government asking it to fulfill its creed that all men are created equal.”—Baltimore Sun, August 1999--

Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum, Sponsor-Rededicated 2015-Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Mayor
 
Erected 2015 by City of Baltimore.
 
Location. 39° 18.268′ N, 76° 37.614′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is on Eutaw Place. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1320 Eutaw Place, Baltimore MD 21217, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lillie Carroll Jackson Museum (was a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing. ); Early Civil Rights Era (a few steps from this marker); St. James Court (a few steps from this marker); Sidney Lanier (within shouting distance of this marker); Howard A. Kelly, M.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); Daniel Coit Gilman (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Md. Prince Hall Masons (about 300 feet away); Francis Scott Key (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsPolitics

 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 27, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 27, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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