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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Barkhamsted in Litchfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village

A Connecticut State Archaeological Preserve

 
 
Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 22, 2016
1. Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Marker
Archaeological research directed by Ken Feder at Central Connecticut State University
Inscription.
Who Lived Here ?

James Chaugham (a Native American who was, according to his granddaughter, a member of the Narragansett Tribe) and his wife, Molly (of European descent), lived in a village located here for fifty years, in what became Peoples State Forest. Their descendants remained until the village was abandoned by 1860.

James and Molly had eight children, seven of whom lived to adulthood, six of whom married and had children of their own, who also remained here as the village grew.

People of African and European origin, as well as Native Americans, moved into what became a thriving multiethnic and multicultural village here on the side of Ragged Mountain in Barkhamsted.

Til Ellwell, born in 1849, was James’ and Molly’s great, great granddaughter. She lived in the village until the mid-1850’s.

The Barkhamsted town clerk recorded the birth of a baby girl on May 14, 1858. Her place of residence was listed as “Barkhamsted Light House.”
 
Erected by Barkhamsted Historical Society and Farmington River Coordinating Committee.
 
Location. 41° 56.559′ N, 73° 0.438′ W. Marker is in Barkhamsted, Connecticut, in Litchfield County.
<center> Walk Back in Time image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, March 22, 2016
2.
Walk Back in Time
The Lighthouse Trail is an easy walk that takes you past five locations in the village:
The Cemetery where James, Molly, and some of their descendants are buried.
A Cellar Hole, one of a dozen or so excavated at the site by archaeologists.
The Stone Quarry where village residents sculpted foundation stones.
The Grind Stone in which village residents likely ground corn into meal.
Charcoal Kilns where fuel was produced for the iron forges of Litchfield County.
Marker is on East River Road 1.7 miles south of Route 20, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is located at the trailhead for the Lighthouse and Jessie Girard Trails. Marker is in this post office area: Barkhamsted CT 06063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Peoples State Forest (a few steps from this marker); Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp White (approx. ¼ mile away); Henry Robinson Buck (approx. ¼ mile away); Austin Hawes Memorial Campground (approx. 0.6 miles away); Squire's Tavern (approx. 1.4 miles away); In Honor of Lambert Hitchcock (approx. 1½ miles away); Riverton (approx. 1½ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barkhamsted.
 
More about this marker. The Lighthouse Trail is a 0.3 mile loop off the Jessie Girard Trail.
 
Regarding Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village.
A Lighthouse in Barkhamsted ?
The trail became a winding road, leadiing past an Indian village... and when the stage came through the night, past the Indian cabins...
Nightly came the stage a-creaking on its journey to New Hartford.....“There’s the Light House!” cried the driver, “Five more miles to reach New Hartford!”.... Lighthouse for
<center> View south from Ragged Mountain to the Tunxis River and New Hartford. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, April 10, 2016
3.
View south from Ragged Mountain to the Tunxis River and New Hartford.
the stage coach traffic....
Thus was named the ancient village....by the winding Tunxis River.
From The Legend of the Barkhamsted Lighthouse, by Lewis S. Mills (1952)

 
Also see . . .
1. Barkhamsted Lighthouse. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Barkhamsted Lighthouse Village. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. Barkhamsted Historical Society. (Submitted on March 27, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. African AmericansAnthropologyNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 27, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 97 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 27, 2017, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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