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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Historic Crossing

 
 
Historic Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 28, 2017
1. Historic Crossing Marker
Inscription. Savannah stands at the junction of two major corridors- the north-south Tennessee River and the east-west road of Memphis. Savannah's secure, high ground and deep water made it an important port. For decades pioneers and area farmers found the water route faster and more economical than land travel. The road leading to the landing is still visible along the stone wall to your right. James Rudd operated the first ferry here in 1815. Over the next forty years thousands of westward emigrants and local travelers crossed the Tennessee River at Savannah.

In 1838, more than 600 Cherokees crossed here during the forced relocation of the Cherokee Nation to the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). The routes they used are collectiveley known as the nunahi-dunatlo-hilu-i- "trail where they cried."
 
Erected by Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Trail of Tears marker series.
 
Location. 35° 13.558′ N, 88° 15.431′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is on West Main Street. Touch for map. West Main dead ends at the historic Cherry Mansion. A walkway leads about 30 yards down to the river and the Trail of Tears Overlook Park. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah TN 38372, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.

Historic Crossing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 28, 2017
2. Historic Crossing Marker
The Historic Crossing Marker is the center marker
At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. War on the River (here, next to this marker); The Cherry Mansion (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Cherry Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); Grant at Cherry Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); War Comes to Savannah (approx. mile away); Joseph Hardin (approx. 0.4 miles away); Approach to Shiloh (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Approach to Shiloh (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Remember and commemorate the survival of the Cherokee people, forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee to live in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. They traveled by foot, horse, wagon, or steamboat in 1838-1839. (Submitted on April 30, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.) 

2. The Trail of Tears in Tennessee Brochure. (Submitted on April 30, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansRoads & Vehicles
 
The Ferry at Savannah image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 28, 2017
3. The Ferry at Savannah
The ferry at Savannah, circa 1900, when it was operated by Alex Haley (grandfather of author Alex Haley, best known for Roots). The Cherry Mansion stands in the background. Alex Haley and his wife, Queen - also the subject of a book by her grandson - are both buried in Savannah.
Trail of Tears Map image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 28, 2017
4. Trail of Tears Map
The "Bell Party," one group of Cherokees trudging overland to "Indian Territory," crossed here in 1838. Other Cherokees traveled on rivers, including the Tennessee. As many as 8,000 Cherokees may have perished during this "Trail of Tears."
The Tennessee River image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 28, 2017
5. The Tennessee River
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 30, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 154 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 30, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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