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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

A Crucial War Zone 1863

 
 
Crucial War Zone 1863 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
1. Crucial War Zone 1863 Marker
Inscription. For the Union, 1863 brought the Emancipation Proclamation, victory at Gettysburg, and the capturing of the Mississippi River. Federal forces continued their drive toward Atlanta in hopes of ending the war altogether. But on March 5th, seven miles (11.3 km) south of here, the Battle of Thompson Station turned into a major loss for the Union, with more than 1,000 men captured. In response thousands of Federal troops occupied this area, and built Fort Granger just east of Franklin, resolving to hold onto this vital region for the duration. By late spring, this immediate area became the front line of the Civil War.

As a result, much of this landscape was destroyed. Both sides striped the countryside of livestock and grain to feed their armies. Churches, public buildings, and schools in Franklin and surrounding communities became headquarters and hospitals. Soldiers tore down barns and homes to build huts and fortifications. Federals in Franklin also chopped down whole forests and orchards, including trees in this area, to provide clear lines of fire for artillery. And the battles continued. In late September, just across the border into Georgia, the Battle of Chickamauga killed and wounded over 28,000 men, including more than seventy locals. It would prove to e the second bloodiest battle of the war.

"Franklin is
Crucial War Zone 1863 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
2. Crucial War Zone 1863 Marker
war worn. The shattered glass in her churches and school houses, her lonely streets and the closed shutters of her store houses, the battered doors and ruined machinery of her manufactories, and above all the deathlike, breathless silence, that absence of all sound, that can be felt nowhere but at the desolate hearthstone, here reigns supreme."
Scot Butler, 33rd Indiana Regiment - 1863
 
Location. 35° 54.298′ N, 86° 51.519′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles from Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Standing at the Crossroads 1861 (here, next to this marker); Becoming the Front Line 1862 (here, next to this marker); The Final Campaign 1864 (here, next to this marker); The Battle of Franklin (here, next to this marker); Hood's Retreat (here, next to this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (a few steps from this marker);
The Confederacy in 1863 image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
3. The Confederacy in 1863
a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .  Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. (Submitted on May 11, 2017.)
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
Fort Granger image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
4. Fort Granger
Postwar photo showing the remains of Fort Granger on Figuers Bluff in the background, with the Harpeth river and the Nashville-Decatur Railroad bridge in the foreground. In the spring of 1863, 1.2 miles (2km) northeast of where you are standing, Union soldiers built the fort to secure the vital rail lines, and to possess a commanding view of this entire area.
George Washington Brown image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
5. George Washington Brown
In 1860, a majority of Williamson County's residents were enslaved. Many area slaves ran away to join the Federals, while others were sent southward by their owners who wanted to hold onto their "property" as long as possible. After the war, whites slightly out-populated African Americans in the county, and the ratio gradually widened thereafter.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 11, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 10, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 80 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 10, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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