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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

No to the Stamp!

 
 
No to the Stamp! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 21, 2017
1. No to the Stamp! Marker
Inscription. “The STAMP-ACT having received a mortal wound by the Hands of Justice, on Saturday last gave up the Ghost, to the great joy of the Inhabitants of Frederick County. The lifeless body lay exposed to public Ignominy 'til Yesterday, when it was thought proper, for preventing infection-from its stench to bury it in the following manner…” — Excerpt from the account appearing in the Maryland Gazette December 16, 1765

On November 30th, 1765, Frederick County citizens assembled here, where their first courthouse stood. They were showing support for the daring action taken a week earlier in which Justices of Frederick County repudiated (rejected) the Crown's new law forcing the colonies to use taxed stamped paper for all business transactions. The deed by the Justices would later be considered the first rebellious act of defiance by an official body toward British Parliament and the King of England.
 
Location. 39° 24.96′ N, 77° 24.757′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Touch for map. At Frederick City Hall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 161 Council Street, Frederick MD 21701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. City Hall (here, next to this marker); The Ross Home
No to the Stamp! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 21, 2017
2. No to the Stamp! Marker
(a few steps from this marker); The Dred Scott Decision (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); Thomas Johnson (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); Birthplace of William Tyler Page (within shouting distance of this marker); Unanimous Resolution (within shouting distance of this marker); “South Magnetic” (within shouting distance of this marker); Frederick’s Poet Lawyer (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Categories. Colonial EraPolitics
 
Burying the Act image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 21, 2017
3. Burying the Act
The Sons of Liberty staged a funeral procession that carried the “deceased” Stamp Act —placed in a coffin— through the principal streets of town to the courthouse square where a gallows had been erected. An effigy (dummy shown above) representing the tax collector, was buried with the Stamp Act. A detailed report of this event appearing in the Maryland Gazette would be reprinted in papers throughout the colonies including Boston, New York and Philadelphia.
Close-up of image on marker
Maryland Gazette Expiring, In Hopes of a Resurrection to Life again... Tuesday Oct. 10, 1765 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 21, 2017
4. Maryland Gazette Expiring, In Hopes of a Resurrection to Life again... Tuesday Oct. 10, 1765
Outspoken Annapolis printer Jonas Green used a “death's head” stamp in his Maryland Gazette to protest the Stamp Act, which also required publishers to use taxed paper. Note that the Maryland Gazette front page (above) from October of that year bears the symbol.
Close-up of image on marker
The Fatal Stamp image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 21, 2017
5. The Fatal Stamp
This is the place to affix the STAMP.
Close-up of image on marker
The British Seal image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 21, 2017
6. The British Seal
This British seal was to be stamped on all paper. The Stamp Act served as tax to recoup payment for the protection given to the American colonies by the Crown during the French and Indian War.
Close-up of image on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 30, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 29, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 29, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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