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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Frederick's Other City”

 
 
“Frederick's Other City” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
1. “Frederick's Other City” Marker
Inscription. When Frederick Town was laid out in 1745, founder Daniel Dulany provided lots to different faith denominations to build churches. These would serve as centers of religious, educational and social life for the new settlers in Maryland's colonial backcountry. Many of these same lots would also serve as the town's first burying grounds. Over the next 100 years, congregations grew in step with the town, necessitating church expansion and additional room for burials. Representatives from Frederick's leading churches came together and called for a new, community-owned, non-denominational, cemetery. This would be located on a large rolling parcel south of town, adjacent the Georgetown Turnpike.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Mount Olivet would collect additional inhabitants as bodies were steadily, re-interred from existing church cemeteries into the dignified and tranquil setting of “Frederick's Other City.”
 
Location. 39° 24.386′ N, 77° 24.759′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Touch for map. At Mount Olivet Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 515 South Market Street, Frederick MD 21701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Maryland's “Cemetery Beautiful”
“Frederick's Other City” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
2. “Frederick's Other City” Marker
(here, next to this marker); O Say Can You See? (a few steps from this marker); Home of the Brave (within shouting distance of this marker); Final Resting Place (within shouting distance of this marker); Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
 
“Frederick's Other City” image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
3. “Frederick's Other City”
Aerial view of cemetery (c. 1949). Today, there are in excess of 38,000 inhabitants, a number that rivals the population of the state capital of Annapolis. Since its inception, Mount Olivet has grown from 32 acres to over 150 acres and it served by eight miles of roadways.
Close-up of photo on marker
Receipt image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
4. Receipt
Early receipt of William J. Ross, first president of the Mount Olivet Cemetery Company.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Cemetery, 1854 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
5. The Cemetery, 1854
Illustrated scene of cemetery from “View of Frederick, Maryland” [Baltimore: E. Sachse & Co.], 1854
Close-up of photo on marker
First Interment: Mrs. Ann Crawford image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
6. First Interment: Mrs. Ann Crawford
Ann Crawford (c. 1793 - 1854) has the distinction of being Mount Olivet's first interment, which took place on May 30, 1854 in Area A, one week after the official dedication of the cemetery.
Barbara Fritchie image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
7. Barbara Fritchie
Barbara Fritchie (1766-1862) defiantly responded “Shoot if you must this old gray head, but spare your country's flag” as the Civil War Unionist & heroine of John Greenleaf Whittier's famed poem.
Close-up of image on marker
Claire McCardell image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
8. Claire McCardell
Claire McCardell (1905 - 1958) was a renowned fashion designer and creator of the “American Look” paving the way for women's aparel changes that would revolutionize the clothing industry.
Close-up of image on marker
Charlotte Winters image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
9. Charlotte Winters
Charlotte Winters (1897 - 2007) was founder of the National Yeoman Association and, at age 109, the last surviving female American veteran of World War I.
close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 8, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 70 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 8, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on June 9, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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