Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Boise City in Cimarron County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Santa Fe Trail

 
 
The Santa Fe Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 15, 2017
1. The Santa Fe Trail
A Bridge Between the United States and Mexico
Inscription.

(Left Panel)
The Santa Fe Trail
A Bridge Between the United States and Mexico


Before you is a portion of the historic Santa Fe Trail. Established as a wagon route by William Becknell in 1822, the Santa Fe Trail became the first major trade link between the eastern United States and the newly established country of Mexico. From the 1820ís to the 1860ís a steady stream of wagon trains followed this historic route. From Missouri came materials and supplies that were vital to the development of northern Mexico; Mexican traders sent silvers, furs, and other products to the U.S. Traveling only 12-15 miles per day the 800 mile trip could take 7 weeks.

With the discovery of gold in California in the late 1840ís, traffic increased greatly on the Santa Fe Trail. Traders, goldseekers and military troops were frequent travelers on the trail throughout the 1850ís. Following the Civil War, however, construction of railroads began in the region. By the 1860ís and 70ís trade items and military freights were increasingly carried by rail. On February 9th, 1880, when the first steam locomotive passed near Santa Fe, New Mexico, the wagon trail was no longer needed. This brought about the end of nearly 60 years of commercial use of the Santa Fe Trail.

(Right Panel)
The Santa
The Santa Fe Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 15, 2017
2. The Santa Fe Trail
A Cultural Tidal Wave Through Indian Land
Fe Trail
A Cultural Tidal Wave Through Indian Land


"I do not want to settled down in the houses you would build for us. I love to roam over the wild prairie. There I am free and happy."
Satanta (White Bear), Kiowa warrior and chief

The Santa Fe Trail had a profound impact on the lives of the Indians of the Southern Plains. Comanche, Kiowa, Plains Apache, Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors fought hard to protect their lands from the arrival of traders and emigrants.

By the mid-1870ís, as a result of intense military pressure and the slaughter of millions of buffalo, these Plain Indian tribes were forced to begin a new life on reservations. While the Santa Fe Trail Trail opened the door to American expansion in the Southwest, it signaled an end to the Plains Indianís nomadic way of life.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Santa Fe Trail marker series.
 
Location. 36° 51.86′ N, 102° 30.952′ W. Marker is near Boise City, Oklahoma, in Cimarron County. Marker is on U.S. 287 3.1 miles north of E0130 Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Boise City OK 73933, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies
Santa Fe Trail Markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 15, 2017
3. Santa Fe Trail Markers
. A different marker also named Santa Fe Trail (a few steps from this marker); The Mormon Battalion in the Oklahoma Panhandle (approx. 9.3 miles away); Boise City Bombed (approx. 9.3 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The Santa Fe Trail ran east-west directly behind the marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Santa Fe National Historic Trail. From the National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 2, 2017.) 

2. Santa Fe Trail Association. Official website of the association. (Submitted on August 2, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansRoads & Vehicles
 
Santa Fe Trail Markers at Roadside Picnic Area image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 15, 2017
4. Santa Fe Trail Markers at Roadside Picnic Area
View to west from US 287
Welcome to the Santa Fe Trail image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 15, 2017
5. Welcome to the Santa Fe Trail
Another interpretive panel at the roadside picnic area
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 2, 2017, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 2, 2017, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.
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