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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Addison in Addison County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Snow Geese

 
 
Snow Geese Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 7, 2017
1. Snow Geese Marker
Inscription.

Snow geese are relatively new to the Dead Creek refuge, having begun to use the area as recently as 1981. Their numbers have continued to increase annually, and peak populations present here in mid-October exceed 20,000 birds.

Snow geese do not breed here but use the refuge for resting and feeding in both spring and fall. They pass through the Lake Champlain migrational corridor twice each year between their wintering ground in the mid-Atlantic states and their breeding areas in the Arctic reaches of eastern Canada. The birds arrive at Dead Creek in mid-to late March and leave in early April. We welcome their return in early October as large flocks descend onto these agricultural fields to rest and feed through November in preparation for the remainder of their southward journey.

The snow geese here are mostly greater snows. Lesser snow geese are similar in appearance, although slightly smaller and generally occur farther west. A few of the lesser snows, including dark-colored individuals referred to as "Blue Geese," may also be observed.

Young snow geese are dusky colored in contrast to the snow white plumage of adults. All find the refuge's combination of corn, buckwheat and green forage crops excellent for replenishing energy reserves needed for migration.

Possessing a strong social nature, snow geese prefer to

Snow Geese Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 7, 2017
2. Snow Geese Marker
Looking SE
remain in large concentrations of their own species which assists their survival and provides a wealth of recreational opportunity for viewing and photography.

[Map caption reads] Snow Goose migration route connecting breeding and wintering areas.
 
Erected by Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department.
 
Location. 44° 5.115′ N, 73° 20.207′ W. Marker is near Addison, Vermont, in Addison County. Marker is on Vermont Route 17W 1.7 miles west of Vermont Route 22A, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Markers are under a shelter at the roadside wildlife viewing area. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2015 Vermont Route 17W, Vergennes VT 05491, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wetland Resources (here, next to this marker); The Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area (here, next to this marker); Canada Geese (here, next to this marker); War Memorial (approx. 1.7 miles away); Benedict Arnold (approx. 4.1 miles away); DAR John Strong Mansion (approx. 4.3 miles away); Northern Terminal of the Crown Point Military Road (approx. 5.3 miles away); Chimney Point (approx. 5.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Addison.
 
Regarding Snow Geese.

Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area Wildlife Viewing Area image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
3. Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area Wildlife Viewing Area
The marker has limited historical information.
 
Also see . . .  Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area. (Submitted on October 26, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. AnimalsEnvironmentWaterways & Vessels
 
Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
4. Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area Sign
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 26, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 26, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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