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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Murphy in Owyhee County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

The Utter Disaster

 
 
The Utter Disaster Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2017
1. The Utter Disaster Marker
Inscription. On September 9 & 10, the Utter Wagon Train engaged in a life-and-death struggle with attacking Indians.
The assault on the wagon train of forty-four emigrants led by Elijah P. Utter just north of here resulted in the death of six men, two women, and three children. Indian casualties were estimated at between 25 and 30. Survivors followed the Snake River to near the mouth of the Owyhee River. When rescued by the Army 45 days later, only fifteen had survived the ordeal of hunger and deprivation. No other Oregon Trail wagon train suffered greater losses.
 
Erected by Idaho Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 493.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Idaho State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 43° 3.251′ N, 116° 18.029′ W. Marker is near Murphy, Idaho, in Owyhee County. Marker is at the intersection of Murphy Grandview Road (State Highway 78) and Wees Road, on the left when traveling west on Murphy Grandview Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Murphy ID 83650, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Utter Wagon Train Disaster (approx. 3.7 miles away).
 
Categories. DisastersRoads & VehiclesSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
The Utter Disaster Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 26, 2017
2. The Utter Disaster Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 17, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 17, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 58 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 17, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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