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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jefferson in Marion County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Trammel's Trace

 
 
Trammel's Trace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. Trammel's Trace Marker
Inscription. Traces began as foot paths used by the Indians to mark their trails through wilderness areas. They later were used by surveyors in mapping early land grants. In 1824 Nicholas Trammel (1780-1852), a government scout, began opening up the trace that now bears his name. Trammel's Trace was, for many years, an important route of immigration into Texas. Approximately 180 miles long, it began at Fulton, Arkansas, and continued to Nacogdoches, Texas. Trammel's Trace entered Marion County on its northern boundary and left the county about 3.5 miles south of Jefferson.
 
Erected 1984 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 8099.)
 
Location. 32° 44.249′ N, 94° 20.782′ W. Marker is in Jefferson, Texas, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of Farm to Market Road 2208 and U.S. 59, on the left when traveling east on Highway 2208. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Jefferson TX 75657, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Marion County Depression Era Roadside Park (here, next to this marker); Jefferson (approx. mile away); Stilley-Young House (approx. 1.2 miles away); Early Jefferson Lodge Building
Trammel's Trace Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
2. Trammel's Trace Marker (wide view)
(approx. 1.2 miles away); Old Federal Court and Post Office Building (approx. 1.3 miles away); Brown-Bender House (approx. 1.3 miles away); Mergenthaler Linotype Typesetting Machine (approx. 1.3 miles away); Captain William Perry (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jefferson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tracing the Trammel.
The pioneers (many with one or two enslaved people traipsing with them) took a circuitous path carved out by Nicholas Trammell, who himself used an old Indian footpath. Nicholas Trammell (1780-1856) exemplified many of the new settlers to this water-logged, flat, and isolated portion of the Red River: he was an adventurer, explorer, tradesman, interpreter, surveyor, capitalist, horse racer, and a person with "itchy feet" who operated ferries, horse trading operations, farms, and taverns along the White, Red, and Guadalupe Rivers in Arkansas and Texas. Some have accused him of stealing slaves and horses, but lots of that information is unsubstantiated. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Trammel's Trace Map.
Excellent map of Trammel's Trace. This marker is roughly in the
Trammel's Trace Marker (<i>wide view showing adjacent marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
3. Trammel's Trace Marker (wide view showing adjacent marker)
center of the map, just south of Jefferson, Texas (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Excerpts from the Dedication of a Different "Trammel's Trace" marker.
About the time of our disastrous war with England in 1812, Nicholas Trammel, Jr., began the trail now bearing his name which formed a connecting link between the Southwest Trail from St. Louis and the Camio Real (King's Highway). It ran from Fulton, Arkansas to Nacogdoches and was the first road to Texas from the Northeast. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 3, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on December 3, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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