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Jefferson in Marion County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Jefferson C.S.A.

 
 
Jefferson C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. Jefferson C.S.A. Marker
Inscription. Metropolis of commerce and culture for East Texas, Jefferson became important center for Confederate activity. Major quartermaster depot for northern Texas established 1862 supplied clothing and camp equipment. Cotton Bureau Station set up to buy cotton, "life blood of the Confederacy." Two iron works in county made plows, kettles, skillets and cannon balls. Thousands of cattle and sheep were driven to slaughter house for processing and shipment. Boot and shoe factory helped outfit army. Debarkation center for troops leaving Texas.

A memorial to Texans
who served the Confederacy

 
Erected 1963 by The State of Texas. (Marker Number 8055.)
 
Location. 32° 45.353′ N, 94° 20.72′ W. Marker is in Jefferson, Texas, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of West Austin Street and South Vale Street, on the right when traveling east on West Austin Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 211 West Austin Street, Jefferson TX 75657, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jay Gould Railroad Car (here, next to this marker); Excelsior House (a few steps from this marker); Captain William Perry (within shouting distance of this marker); Brown-Bender House (within shouting distance of this marker); Murphy Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Federal Court and Post Office Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Early Jefferson Lodge Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Mergenthaler Linotype Typesetting Machine (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jefferson.
 
More about this marker. Large, weathered pink granite marker
 
Also see . . .
1. Jefferson, Texas.
Jefferson was an important shipping and small manufacturing site for the Confederacy; goods from Texas were shipped from here through Lake Cypress on to the headquarters of the Trans-Mississippi Confederacy at Shreveport. This included gunpowder made in powder mills a dozen miles south in the country nearer to Marshall, Texas. During Reconstruction, anti-government sentiment ran so high a Federal garrison was established here to protect Freedman and government property and enforce Reconstruction laws. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Federal Troops Advance on Jefferson.
Gen. Nathaniel Banks and his Federal forces spent the spring of 1864 slowly making their way up the Red River but were repulsed by Confederate forces in battle near Mansfield, Louisiana. Had U.S. troops managed to fight through and capture Shreveport, the East Texas supply depots in Marshall and Jefferson would have been targeted next, cutting off Texas and her war material from the Confederate effort. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Jefferson's Civil War History.
In the Steamboat days, when Jefferson was a trading partner with New Orleans and Shreveport, Jefferson was a strategic outpost during the Civil War. On Big Cypress Bayou, just east of downtown, the Confederate Army established an ordnance works. The ordnance works consisted of three powder magazines (only one is still standing), barracks, a warehouse and other out buildings. Ammunition that was manufactured in Marshall and other Texas cities was brought to Jefferson, stored at the ordnance works and then transferred east to be used in battle. The ordnance works was built away from downtown in case there were any accidental explosions. (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Battle of Port Jefferson.
Jefferson's actual role in the Civil War was as a manufacturing and supply depot for the Confederacy. What might have happened in and around Jefferson if Federal troops had been successful in the Red River Campaign and captured Shreveport? (Submitted on December 5, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 3, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photo   1. submitted on December 3, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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