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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Volcano in Hawaii County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Explosive eruptions rock Kīlauea volcano

 
 
Explosive eruptions rock Kīlauea volcano Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 4, 2017
1. Explosive eruptions rock Kīlauea volcano Marker
Inscription. Oli (chants) and mo'olelo (stories of this region recount the celebrated battle between Pelehonuamea (Pele, the volcano deity) and her sister, Hi'iakaikapoliopele (Hi'iaka), that erupted here at the summit of Kīlauea.
After a series of vengeful acts between the sisters, Hi'iaka retaliated. She stomped furiously and violently clawed her way into the volcano in an attempt to destroy Pele.
The stories carefully chronicle a series of intense earthquakes and explosions that hurled rocks out of the deepening pit. Towering ash clouds turned day into night and lightning pierced the skies.

Science corroborates that this account was based on actual events.

Ash deposits and carbon dating confirm that the summit of Kīlauea collapsed around 1490. Geologists estimated the initial abyss may have been over 2,000 feet (600 m) deep.
Explosions occurred repeatedly over the next 300 years, culminating in the deadly eruption of 1790 when clouds of ash surged outwards over 2 miles (3.5 km).
In a final expression of volcanic fury, violent explosions flung dense rock from the floor of the caldera up and over the rim. A 6-ton boulder just ahead stands as a monument to the awesome power and explosive potential of Hawaiian volcanos.

As Hi'iaka reshaped the land,
Explosive eruptions rock Kīlauea volcano Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 4, 2017
2. Explosive eruptions rock Kīlauea volcano Marker
she provided a precious gift to the people of Hawai'i

In the early 1800s, historian Samuel Kamakau wrote in "Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii" that ... the best stone for the purpose (of carving canoes) was the hokele rock (dense and fine-grained rocks that were blasted out of the caldera) ... and the adze were fashioned at the crater of Pele where hokele rock was to be found ...
In 2001, the park archeologists discovered more than 277 stone working stations were skilled workers labored over hokele found in this area. Craftsmen used smaller stones to make knife blades and drill bits. Larger rocks were sculpted into ko'i (adze), one of the most important tools to the people of pre-contact Hawaii.
 
Erected by National Park Service, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.
 
Location. 19° 25.398′ N, 155° 17.052′ W. Marker is in Volcano, Hawaii, in Hawaii County. Marker can be reached from Crater Rim Drive near Mauna Loa Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Volcano HI 96785, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mauna Loa (approx. 0.4 miles away); The "Firepit" of Halema'uma'u (approx. 1.4 miles away); Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Kīlauea Caldera image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 4, 2017
3. Kīlauea Caldera
(approx. 1.7 miles away); The Volcano House reigns as one of America's great lodges (approx. 1.7 miles away); Kilauea (approx. 1.8 miles away); Countless are the Accomplishments of Roosevelt's Trusty "Tree Army" (approx. 1.8 miles away); Once in their lifetime, silverswords erupt in flowers (approx. 8.2 miles away); Mauna Ulu (approx. 8.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Volcano.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located at Kīlauea Overlook in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.
 
Categories. AnthropologyChurches & ReligionNatural Features
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 65 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 4, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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