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Bryan in Brazos County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Town Named for William Joel Bryan

(1814-1903)

 
 
Town Named for William Joel Bryan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 26, 2014
1. Town Named for William Joel Bryan Marker
Inscription.
Native of Missouri. Member of prominent family who were Texas statesmen, planters, developers. Grandson of Moses Austin, who obtained from Mexico charter for American Colony in Texas, but died before making settlement. Nephew of Stephen F. Austin, "Father of Texas", who actually established the colony.

Came to Texas with his mother, Emily Austin Bryan Perry, in 1831. During Texas Revolution, fought in Battle of Bexar, 1835. For 71 years was a planter on land near Peach Point, where the bachelor Stephen F. Austin had a room reserved for him in Perry Home.

As eldest nephew, inherited family leadership when Stephen F. Austin died in 1836. Backed his brothers' careers, especially in the case of Guy M. Bryan, U.S. Congressman 1858-1860, and for many years a leader in Texas government.

During the Civil War, cared for business interests of his 4 sons in the Confederate Army. At his own expense fed Confederate troops stationed near his plantation to defend the Texas coast.

Backed construction of Deep Water Harbor at mouth of the Brazos. During building of Houston & Texas Central Railroad, donated site for Bryan, which in 1866 became county seat of Brazos County.
 
Erected 1965 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 8669.)
 
Location.
Town Named for William Joel Bryan Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 26, 2014
2. Town Named for William Joel Bryan Marker (tall view)
30° 40.421′ N, 96° 22.248′ W. Marker is in Bryan, Texas, in Brazos County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East 26th Street and North Washington Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located in small plaza near Brazos County Courthouse main entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 East 26th Street, Bryan TX 77803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brazos County Confederate Commissioners Court (here, next to this marker); Brazos County (here, next to this marker); Carnegie Public Library (approx. 0.2 miles away); Queen Theater (approx. 0.2 miles away); La Salle Hotel (approx. 0.2 miles away); Texas A&M University (approx. 4.3 miles away); Shiloh Community (approx. 6.1 miles away); Route of El Camino Real (approx. 8.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bryan.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. William Joel Bryan.
Bryan served in the Texas Revolution in 1835 with the Brazoria County Volunteers and was with his uncle, Stephen F. Austin, during the siege of Bexar. He was with Sam Houston in the retreat of the army across Texas. During the Civil War he fed Confederate troops stationed at the mouth of the Brazos at his own expense. In 1865
Town Named for William Joel Bryan Marker (<i>wide view; Brazos County Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 26, 2014
3. Town Named for William Joel Bryan Marker (wide view; Brazos County Courthouse in background)
he granted the Houston and Texas Central a right-of-way through his land in Brazos County, and a projected townsite, later called Bryan, was named in his honor. (Submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. History of Bryan, Texas.
Before there was Bryan, there was Millican. The Houston and Texas Central (H&TC) Railroad Co. arrived in this community in 1860, making it the northernmost terminus. It soon became a vital distribution center for freight and Confederate troops throughout the Civil War. That same year, William Joel Bryan, nephew of Stephen F. Austin, sold a single square-mile tract in a townsite north of Millican to railroad directors Abram Groesbeck and W.R. Baker. The $3,200 purchase would soon become a full-fledged city serving the railway, its employees and its passengers. (Submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 55 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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