Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Seguin in Guadalupe County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch

 
 
Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2014
1. Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker
Inscription.
Born in San Antonio, Jose Antonio Navarro (1795-1871) held several offices in the Mexican government before becoming an active participant in the movement for Texas independence. Navarro possessed numerous landholdings in this part of the state. In 1832, he purchased land along Geronimo Creek (approx. 1.2 mi. E) for farming and ranching activities. The ranch house served as a haven for his family during his captivity by the Mexican militia in 1841 until his return to the ranch in 1845. A signer of Texas Declaration of Independence, Navarro owned the ranch until 1853.
 
Erected 1986 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 2852.)
 
Location. 29° 38.427′ N, 97° 58.024′ W. Marker is near Seguin, Texas, in Guadalupe County. Marker is on State Highway 123 3.1 miles north of Interstate 10, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pull-out on the east side of the highway. Marker is in this post office area: Seguin TX 78155, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of Dietz Community (approx. 4.8 miles away); Edmund P. Kuempel Rest Area (approx. 9.9 miles away); Hinmann House
Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2014
2. Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker
(approx. 10.4 miles away); Spaß und Gemütlichkeit (approx. 10.4 miles away); Comal County Courthouse (approx. 10.4 miles away); New Braunfels (approx. 10.4 miles away); Henry D. Gruene (approx. 10.6 miles away); Gruene's Hall (approx. 10.7 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. José Antonio Navarro.
Along with his uncle, José Francisco Ruiz, and Lorenzo de Zavala, he became one of the three Mexican signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Later, he favored the annexation of Texas to the United States, and was the sole Hispanic delegate to the Convention of 1845, which ultimately accepted the American proposal. He remained to help write the first state constitution, the Constitution of 1845. He was twice elected to the state Senate. In 1846, in the Texas legislature named the newly established Navarro County in his honor. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. José Antonio Baldemero Navarro.
Navarro owned granted and purchased lands in current Atascosa, Karnes, Guadalupe, Travis and Bastrop counties on which he developed productive ranch enterprises while he practiced law, was a merchant
Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2014
3. Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker
and served the people of the State at all levels of government. The Navarro family home ranch in 1838 was north of current Seguin (then Walnut Springs) on San Geronimo Creek near Ewing Springs. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Giants of Texas History: Jose Antonio Navarro.
José Antonio Navarro was the most influential Tejano of his generation. He championed Texas independence from Mexico, then fought for the rights of Tejanos as citizens of the Republic of Texas and the United States. A Texas patriot to the end, Navarro supported secession from the United States in 1861, and his four sons served in the Confederate army. He died in 1871. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. José Antonio Navarro.
Navarro served three terms in the Texas Senate before retiring from political life in the late 1840s. In his senior years, he owned a ranch in nearby Seguin until he died in 1871. He was interred in the San Fernando Cemetery #1 in San Antonio (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, Texas Independence
 
Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2014
4. Jose Antonio Navarro Ranch Marker (wide view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 10, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 95 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement