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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Pedestrian Bridge over the Templo Mayor

 
 
Pedestrian Bridge over the Templo Mayor Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 4, 2017
1. Pedestrian Bridge over the Templo Mayor Marker
Inscription.
Puente Sobre el Templo Mayor
Este puente atraviesa 700 años de historia de la Ciudad de México. Vas a entrar al corazón del que fuera el Recinto Sagrado de Tenochitlan, una de las ciudades más importantes del mundo antigio. Este espacio público ha sido creado para que aprecies la excepcionalidad del Templo Mayor.

English:
Pedestrian Bridge over the Templo Mayor
This bridge spans 700 years of Mexico City history. You're about to enter what was the holiest shrine in Tenochtitlan, one of the major cities of the ancient world. This public space has been created so you can appreciate the shrine's uniqueness.

Seamos respetuosos
Please be respectful

 
Erected by Instituto Nacional de Arqueología e Historia (INAH).
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization marker series.
 
Location. 19° 26.096′ N, 99° 7.925′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México. Marker is on Calle República de Guatemala just west of Avenida República de Argentina, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México 06000, Mexico.
 
Other nearby markers.
Pedestrian Bridge over the Templo Mayor Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 4, 2017
2. Pedestrian Bridge over the Templo Mayor Marker
The pedestrian bridge connects market areas a few blocks to the north to the historic city center.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cuauhtémoc's Last Message (within shouting distance of this marker); Ignacio Luis Vallarta (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Dr. Antonio Marquez G. (about 90 meters away); House of Luis de Castilla (about 120 meters away); House of Juan Engel (about 120 meters away); The Royal and Pontifical University of Mexico (about 150 meters away); Death of Benito Juárez (about 180 meters away); The Main Chapels of the Cathedral of Mexico City (about 180 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Also see . . .  The Templo Mayor (at Wikipedia). The Templo Mayor (Spanish for "Main Temple") was one of the main temples of the Aztecs in their capital city of Tenochtitlan, which is now Mexico City. Its architectural style belongs to the late Postclassic period of Mesoamerica. The temple was dedicated simultaneously to two gods, Huitzilopochtli, god of war, and Tlaloc, god of rain and agriculture, each of which had a shrine at the top of the pyramid with separate staircases. The spire in the center of the adjacent image was devoted to Quetzalcoatl in his form as the wind god, Ehecatl. The Great Temple devoted to Huitzilopochtli and Tlaloc, measuring approximately 100 by 80 m (328 by 262 ft) at its base, dominated the Sacred Precinct. Construction
A view of the Templo Mayor ruins from the pedestrian bridge image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 4, 2017
3. A view of the Templo Mayor ruins from the pedestrian bridge
The bridge looks out onto the ruins of the Templo Mayor complex. The temple was destroyed by the Spanish and its stones used to construct other buildings in the historic city center.
of the first temple began sometime after 1325, and it was rebuilt six times. The temple was destroyed by the Spanish in 1521 to make way for the new cathedral. Today, the archaeological site lies just to the northeast of the Zócalo, or main plaza of Mexico City, in the block between Seminario and Justo Sierra streets. The site is part of the Historic Center of Mexico City, which was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1987.
(Submitted on December 11, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.) 
 
Categories. AnthropologyArchitectureMan-Made FeaturesNative Americans
 
Imagining the Templo Mayor in its historical location in Mexico City image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 4, 2017
4. Imagining the Templo Mayor in its historical location in Mexico City
A series of posters line the pedestrian bridge, including this image of what the Templo Mayor would look like if it still stood in downtown Mexico City.
A nearby UNESCO World Heritage marker from 1988 image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 4, 2017
5. A nearby UNESCO World Heritage marker from 1988
This marker near the entrance to the nearby Templo Mayor Museum notes that the Historic Center of Mexico City was named a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1988.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 30, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 11, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 67 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 11, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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