Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

The House of the Count of San Mateo Valparaiso

 
 
The House of the Count of San Mateo Valparaiso Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 4, 2017
1. The House of the Count of San Mateo Valparaiso Marker
Inscription.
Esta fue la casa del Conde
de San Mateo Valparaiso

construida por el Arquitecto
Francisco Guerrero Torres el
año de 1780
Dirección de monumentos colonials y de la República

English translation:
This was the house of the
Count of San Mateo Valparaiso
constructed by the Architect Francisco Guerrero Torres
in 1780.
Office of Monuments of the Colony and the Republic

 
Erected by Dirección de monumentos coloniales y de la República.
 
Location. 19° 26.028′ N, 99° 8.34′ W. Marker is in Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México. Marker is on Avenida Francisco I. Madero just west of Calle Bolívar, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Avenida Francisco I. Madero 17, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de México 06000, Mexico.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Residence of Agustín Iturbide (here, next to this marker); Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (a few steps from this marker); The Expiatory Temple of San Felipe de Jesús (within shouting distance of this marker); José de la Borda
The House of the Count of San Mateo Valparaiso Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 4, 2017
2. The House of the Count of San Mateo Valparaiso Marker
The marker is to the left of the entrance to what is now the Banamex Palace of Culture (Palacio de Cultura Banamex). The marker to the right is "The Residence of Agustín Iturbide."
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Temple of San Francisco (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); Sebastián de Aparicio (about 120 meters away); House of the Count of the Valley of Orizaba (about 120 meters away); La Casa de los Azulejos (about 150 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ciudad de Mexico.
 
Also see . . .  Palace of Culture Banamex (in Spanish). With the marriage of Miguel de Berrio y Zaldívar, First Marquis of Jaral de Berrio, and his wife Ana María de la Campa y Cos, Second Countess of San Mateo de Valparaíso, this palace was built between 1779 and 1785, having as a director of works the architect Francisco Guerrero y Torres. The building became famous as the Palace of Iturbide since it was inhabited by Agustín de Iturbide before being crowned Emperor of Mexico, on May 15, 1822. From 1830 to 1834 it was the seat of the Mining College and later it housed commercial businesses and public offices. As of 1851, it functioned as a hotel. With the passage of time the palace suffered many changes. In 1964, the building was acquired by the National Bank of Mexico as part of a project to restore viceroyal architecture, with the restoration works being completed on March 24, 1972. Since then, it has been the operational headquarters of Banamex Cultural Development efforts. Among its most important restorations stands out the one begun in 2002 by the master architect Legorreta, which restored this building to the splendor of its earlier years. It was reopened as the Banamex Palace of Culture on January 19, 2004. (Translated from the Cultural Information Service site) (Submitted on December 12, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureColonial EraMan-Made FeaturesPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 12, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 68 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 12, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
Paid Advertisement