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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carville in Iberville Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Administration Building, U.S. Public Health Service Hospital, Carville

 
 
Administration Building Marker image. Click for full size.
December 9, 2017
1. Administration Building Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
Indian Camp Plantation, Henry Howard, Architect, Built 1859, Wood, Masonry & Steel, Sq.Ft. 17,042

Facing River Road in a prominent position at the entrance to the grounds is Indian Camp Plantation, the most important single architectural feature of the hospital complex. Constructed in 1859, for sugar planter Robert C. Camp (1805-c. 1875) the house was designed and built by the well-known New Orleans architect Henry Howard (1818-1884). Indian Camp was designed for ease of living and frequent entertaining. Howard also built Nottoway Plantation directly across the Mississippi River. Indian Camp is a "raised cottage" style mansion featuring a central mass with a double gallery and flanking 2-story wings. The 1st, or bottom floor, was used for plantation offices and storage. The second floor was the principal living area. At the time of the house's construction, there was most certainly a staircase in front, leading from the 2nd floor gallery to the ground. The facade is well detailed and features Corinthian column capitals fashioned from leaf and scroll motif.

When the Daughter of Charity arrived to care for the leprosy patients in 1896, the

Administration Building Marker image. Click for full size.
December 9, 2017
2. Administration Building Marker
structure was generally dilapidated, if not abandoned. The Sisters found only 2 rooms habitable. These were converted into a dormitory and community room. When the State of Louisiana purchased the site in 1905, they did substantial restoration to the plantation. It was repaired again after a major hurricane struck Carville in 1909.

The property changed hands again in 1921 when the federal government purchased the hospital and it became the National Leprosarium. The plantation was renovated to function as the center of Administrative activities. It provided staff with their own medical, dining and recreation areas and continued to provide housing for the Daughters of Charity. In 1941, the Daughters of Charity moved into their new house, Building II, next door. Today, Indian Camp Plantation continues to be the administrative hub of the Carville Historic District.
 
Location. 30° 11.742′ N, 91° 7.553′ W. Marker is in Carville, Louisiana, in Iberville Parish. Marker can be reached from Point Clair Road (State Highway 141) one mile north of Martin Luther King Parkway (State Highway 75), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5445 Point Clair Road, Carville LA 70721, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Indian Camp Plantation (a few steps from this marker); Cage Door of Harry T. Chimpanzee (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The STAR (about 300 feet away); The Daughters of Charity (about 300 feet away); Triumph At Carville: A Tale of Leprosy in America (about 300 feet away); Staff Housing, U.S. Public Health Service Hospital, Carville (about 400 feet away); Belle Grove Plantation (approx. mile away); A Civil War Soldier (approx. 2.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carville.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located inside the National Guard Site, but is part of the Museum's self driving tour. No photography is permitted except markers and site cemetery. This is currently an active Military base so check before visiting, and for other regulations which may apply.
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USArchitectureGovernmentNotable Buildings

 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2017, by Cajun Scrambler of Assumption, Louisiana. This page has been viewed 99 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 16, 2017.
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