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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cahaba in Dallas County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Memorials for Prisoners of War

 
 
Memorials for Prisoners of War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
1. Memorials for Prisoners of War Marker
Inscription. These are not graves.
These are markers to memoralize the Federal soldiers who died in the Cahawba Military Prison during the Civil War. The men within the prison called it "Castle Morgan."

No one knows where in Cahawba these men were initially buried. However, we do know that they are no longer here. In 1867, after the war, the Federal government dug them up and moved them to a cemetery in Montgomery Alabama. Later they were moved again to Marietta National Cemetery in Georgia, where they rest today.

With each move, a new list of the dead was made. The numbers of unknowns increased as names got separated from bodies. There are many discrepancies among the lists, but the original Cahawba hospital ledger recorded 142 deaths.

Lest We Forget
Several government employees and citizens of Northern states died in Castle Morgan. The Veteran's Administration graciously supplied these memorial markers but could not supply markers for citizen deaths. Here is a list of those men's names, states, and death dates:

Henry Fairchild, unknown, Sept. 8, 1864
Martin N. Hardy, Illinois, Sept 25, 1864
S. D. Adams, unknown, Sept. 25, 1864
Calvin Erving, Illinois, Oct. 8, 1864
(or Alvin Irving)
N. M. Edwards, unknown, Jan. 8, 1865
G.
Memorials for Prisoners of War Marker and cenotaphs. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
2. Memorials for Prisoners of War Marker and cenotaphs.
D. Smith, New York, Jan. 11, 1865
John Lowdon, New York, Jan. 22, 1865
W. G. Watson, Maine, Feb. 14, 1865

Major Hiram Solon Hanchett
16th Illinois Cavalry

On January 20th, 1865, Major Hanchett led a daring but unsuccessful revolt inside the military prison. In March when the other soldiers were sent to parole camp, the post commandant Sam Jones detained Hanchett because he believed him to be a spy. In April, as Union forces were approaching, Confederate soldiers seized Hanchett, took him from town and executed him. His body lies today in an unmarked grave.
 
Erected 2015 by the Alabama Historical Commission.
 
Location. 32° 18.871′ N, 87° 6.435′ W. Marker is in Cahaba, Alabama, in Dallas County. Marker can be reached from Cahaba Road. Touch for map. Located next to the Cahawba Capitol Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9098 Cahaba Road, Orrville AL 36767, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); New Cemetery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Missing Pieces (approx. 0.4 miles away); Alabama's Native Prairie (approx. 0.4 miles away);
Memorials for Prisoners of War cenotaph markers. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
3. Memorials for Prisoners of War cenotaph markers.
Cahaba's Changing Landscape (approx. 0.4 miles away); Black Belt Transformations (approx. 0.4 miles away); Anna Gayle Fry House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Methodist Church (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cahaba.
 
Also see . . .  Find-A-Grave showing 111 memorials. (Submitted on January 7, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Entrance sign to the Cahawba Archaeological Park Site. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
4. Entrance sign to the Cahawba Archaeological Park Site.
The Civil War Memorials are about 500 feet down the road.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 7, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 81 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 7, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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