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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Helens in Columbia County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

down the trodden path...

 
 
"down the trodden path..." Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 10, 2015
1. "down the trodden path..." Marker
Inscription.
The path before you represents the Corps of Discovery's journey on the Columbia River – from its confluence with the Snake to the Pacific Ocean. Entering the Columbia in mid-October 1805, they travelled along the river from shore to shore emerging at its mouth on November 7, 1805. The expedition overwintered at Fort Clatsop (Astoria) and returned home the following spring, passing many of the same landmarks.

The black granite tiles portray journal entries and summaries of the travel down the Columbia toward the Ocean. The return journey is addressed by the green tiles. The "art" tiles with "found objects" are designed to pique your curiosity about the expedition's discoveries.

All the tiles are proportionately spaced according to the expedition's progression along the river. Closely spaced tiles indicate longer time spent at certain locations; tiles spaced far apart indicate a greater travel distance along the river. To experience this journey, walk the path and read the journals. Learn about obstacles and discoveries recorded by Lewis and Clark in 1805-06. A magnifying glass icon indicates the discovery of a new plant or animal species.

Lewis and Clark were instructed by President Jefferson to take careful note of the plants and animals of the West. In all, the expedition
"down the trodden path..." Marker (<i>wide view; showing black granite tiles along the path</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 10, 2015
2. "down the trodden path..." Marker (wide view; showing black granite tiles along the path)
recorded 178 plants and 122 animals never previously described. During the winter respite of 1805-06 at Fort Clatsop, OR, Meriwether Lewis described 35 mammals, 50 birds, 10 reptiles and fish, and 5 invertebrates - of these, 11 mammals, 11 birds, and 2 fish were new to science.

President Jefferson also instructed the explorers to meet with Indian tribes and record their customs, languages, populations, religions, food, clothing, and willingness to trade with Americans. Their journals are filled with entries - providing in some instances the first and sometimes the only - detailed descriptions of this region's different native peoples.

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition marker series.
 
Location. 45° 51.795′ N, 122° 47.838′ W. Marker is in St. Helens, Oregon, in Columbia County. Marker is at the intersection of Yachts Landing and The Strand, on the left when traveling west on Yachts Landing. Touch for map. Marker is located in Plaza Square, west of the old Columbia County Courthouse building. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Helens OR 97051, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lewis & Clark Discovery Trail (a few steps from this marker); Warrior Rock Fog Bell
"down the trodden path..." Marker (<i>wide view; old Columbia County Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 10, 2015
3. "down the trodden path..." Marker (wide view; old Columbia County Courthouse in background)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Woodland Community Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.6 miles away in Washington); Deer Island (approx. 5½ miles away); Early Highway of the West (approx. 7.2 miles away in Washington); Fort Vancouver (approx. 7.2 miles away in Washington); The Finn Hall (approx. 7½ miles away in Washington); Thomas KcKay (approx. 8.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Helens.
 
Also see . . .
1. Scientific Encounters.
Between 1804 and 1806, Lewis and Clark made the first systematic reports, based on scientific measurement and observations, of the Missouri River--not only its course, but its flora and fauna, depth and current, tributaries and inhabitants. They continued onward to document their observations in the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Northwest. Lewis and Clark described for science at least 120 mammals, birds, reptiles and fish, as well as at least 182 plant species. (Submitted on January 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Lewis and Clark encountered many new species of animals and plants.
On Lewis and Clark's expedition, they encountered 120 mammals, reptiles,
Path Stones image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 10, 2015
4. Path Stones
November 12, 1805
Megler, WA

"...Lightining, hard claps of Thunder, and Hail... Canoes at the mercy of the waves, altho Secured as Well as possible, Sunk with emence parcels of Stone to wate them down..." Clark

November 11, 1805
Megler, WA

“...those people left… through the highest waves I ever Saw a Small vestles ride. Those Indians are Certainly the best Canoe navigaters I ever Saw." Clark

November 10, 1805
Megler, WA

rained very hard most of last night • waves & wind have calmed • canoed 10 miles • waves high so we found camp • storing loads away from the tide
and fish. Some examples of these animals are Coyotes, Eastern Wood Rats, Grizzly Bears, Prairie Dogs, and Pronghorn Antelopes. On these expeditions, when they found an animal or specimen, they would send them back to the known part of the USA. (Submitted on January 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Lewis & Clark Expedition: Wildlife Species Information.
Lewis and Clark became the first scientists to document the natural history of the American West. They were careful and accurate observers, and the experts of the time had trained Lewis in natural history and the methods of collecting samples of plants and animals. From St. Louis up the Missouri River, over the Continental Divide, down the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean and back again, they recorded 178 plants and 122 animals previously unknown to science. (Submitted on January 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationNative AmericansScience & MedicineSettlements & Settlers
 
Path Stones image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 10, 2015
5. Path Stones
December 5, 1805
Emerald Heights, OR

"...repeeted rains and hard winds... renders it impossible for me to move with loaded Canoes along an unknown Coast … all wet & disagreeable."
Clark

December 4, 1805
Emerald Heights, OR

some rain during night • sent 7 men to retrieve elk • feel much better • spring tide rose 2 feet higher • waves too high for men to follow to elk kill location

December 3, 1805
Emerald Heights, OR

fair windy morning • men return with elk • I am too sick to eat • feel much setter after eating wapato • 6 more elk killed far away
Path Stones image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 10, 2015
6. Path Stones
December 7, 1805
Fort Clatsop, OR

Clark made a supply list: Frow, malet, Beeds, Thimbles, B. Clothe, Salt, 20 lb. Lead, Glass, Bells, 1 Kittle, 2 guns, looking glasses, Sugar, Coffee, Bread, Tobacco, Pork

December 6, 1805
Emerald Heights, OR

"The high tide of today is 13 inches higher than yesterday, and obliged us to move our Camp which was in a low Situation."
Clark
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 75 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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