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Gold Beach in Curry County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Gold Beach

 
 
Gold Beach Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
1. Gold Beach Marker
Inscription.
Gold discovered on the beaches at the mouth of Rogue River in the mid-1800s brought miners here; resulted in the Rogue River Indian Wars of 1855-56.

Prattsville, Ellensburg, officially becoming Gold Beach in 1890. In the 60ís returns from the beach mining began to shrink and commercial salmon fishing became the principal industry.

The first ferry across the Rogue at Ellensburg was established in 1857, followed in 1890 by a wagon road connecting Gold Beach with the north and south. The Roosevelt Highway (HIWY 101) was completed in 1932 with the opening of the Rogue River Bridge.

Gold Beach, which has been the County Seat of Curry County since 1859, became an incorporated city in 1945.
 
Location. 42° 25.013′ N, 124° 25.18′ W. Marker is in Gold Beach, Oregon, in Curry County. Marker is on Ellensburg Avenue (U.S. 101) north of Gauntlett Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in front of the Curry County Courthouse, near the southwest corner of the courthouse grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 29821 Ellensburg Avenue, Gold Beach OR 97444, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Patterson Bridge
Gold Beach Marker (<i>wide view; Curry County Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
2. Gold Beach Marker (wide view; Curry County Courthouse in background)
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Mary D. Hume (approx. 0.4 miles away); Gold Beach Ranger Station (approx. one mile away); Cape San Sebastian (approx. 5.7 miles away); Conflict at Pistol River (approx. 9.6 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Market is a large wooden structure, somewhat weathered
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of the Rogue River.
The first settlers to arrive in this region were trappers and fur traders seeking pelts. They named the area “River of the Rogues” after the Native Americans that refused to give up their homes without a fight. The area saw a huge influx of settlers following the passage of the Donation Land Act in 1850, which gave couples 320 acres, and single white men 160 acres, if they lived and cultivated the land for at least 4 years. The area was flooded with thousands of additional settlers in late 1851 when gold was discovered on the Rogue. Over $70 million worth of gold was panned from the Rogue River. (Submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Oregon History: Indian Wars.
The causes of conflict erupted everywhere. The
Curry County Courthouse (<i>marker is located in front of the Courthouse</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
3. Curry County Courthouse (marker is located in front of the Courthouse)
Donation Land Act became law in 1850. Years passed before treaties, negotiated in 1853 and 1854, were ratified. Some, such as those of Anson Dart or the Willamette Valley Treaty Commission of 1851, never gained Senate approval. In spite of the promises of superintendents of Indian affairs Dart and Palmer, the white people poured in. Dispossession ruled. The miners drove the Takelma, Shasta, Chetco, Shasta Costa, Mikonotunne, Tututni, Galice Creeks and Cow Creeks from their villages. Located on old stream terraces, the Indian homes were prime locations for placer deposits. (Submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Rogue River Bridge.
The Rogue River Bridge spans the mouth of the Rogue River between Gold Beach and Wedderburn at milepost 327.64 on the Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101). Known as the Isaac Lee Patterson Bridge after the Oregon governor who promoted its construction, the bridge was completed in 1932. It is one of six major bridges designed by Conde B. McCullough, Oregonís state bridge engineer from 1919 to 1937, as part of a project to span the three bays and three river estuaries that relied on outmoded ferry service along the highway. (Submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWars, US IndianWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 28, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 65 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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