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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Florence in Lane County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Technology Spans

A Sea-Sculptured Landscape

 
 
Technology Spans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
1. Technology Spans Marker
Inscription.
If this historic bridge and tunnel werenít here, what would it be like to cross Cape Creek?

Engineers building the Pacific Coast Highway in the early 1930s encountered an unusual challenge here at Cape Creek, a deep, offset gorge, carved over thousands of years by the power of sea and creek.

Famed bridge designer Conde B. McCullough, a State Bridge Engineer, used both old and new technology to meet the challenge. His Cape Creek Bridge design is similar to Roman aqueducts, with two lower viaduct sections supporting a taller, open-spandrel deck arch.

McCullough used a cutting-edge technology in this Roman-inspired design: steel-reinforced concrete.

"You can't help but wonder how in the dickens the great state of Oregon wants to make an expenditure like this to cross a little creek which isn't more than knee deep."
The Siuslaw Oar,
November 7, 1931
 
Location. 44° 8.035′ N, 124° 7.339′ W. Marker is near Florence, Oregon, in Lane County. Marker can be reached from Cape Creek Road west of Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located in Heceta Head Lighthouse State Park, near the parking lot entrance and overlooking the subject bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Florence OR 97439, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker detail: Bridge-builders community image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
2. Marker detail: Bridge-builders community
A community was set up for the workers on the east side of the bridge. Living in the community was conveniently close to work, but also rustic.
At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Heceta Head Lightstation (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hard Work at a Lonely Light (approx. ľ mile away); Road Behind And Sea Beyond (approx. 0.3 miles away); Designed for Seafarer Safety (approx. 0.4 miles away); A Battle With the Elements (approx. 0.4 miles away); Giant Spruce of Cape Perpetua (approx. 10.3 miles away); Harbor Theater (approx. 11.6 miles away); Welcome to Historic Old Town (approx. 11.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Florence.
 
Regarding Technology Spans. National Register of Historic Places (2005)
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Highway 101 (Oregon Coast Highway).
Throughout the 1930s, the Oregon Department of Transportation and the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads worked to realign some sections of the highway. One was a picturesque five-mile section through rugged terrain north of Florence. It involved constructing a two-tiered reinforced-concrete viaduct and arch bridge over Cape Creek, boring a 714-foot tunnel through Devilís Elbow (Cape Creek Tunnel) and excavating a roadway from the cliffs high above the surf. (Submitted on January 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
Marker detail: Cape Creek Bridge c1931 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
3. Marker detail: Cape Creek Bridge c1931
Cape Creek Bridge before the connecting sections of Highway 101 were paved.

2. Cape Creek Bridge.
The bridge resembles a Roman aqueduct, with a single parabolic arch that spans half its length. The Cape Creek Bridge has been impressed-current cathodically protected (ICCP) from corrosion since 1991. Rebar in concrete is highly susceptible to corrosion by chloride ions from seawater and de-icing salts. Contractors to the Oregon Department of Transportation have plasma-sprayed 102,000 square feet of 0.020-inch thick zinc onto the exposed concrete to provide a sacrificial anode that corrodes in lieu of the steel rebar. (Submitted on January 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Cape Creek Bridge,... Florence, Lane County, OR (Historic American Buildings Survey). (Submitted on January 27, 2018.)
 
Categories. ArchitectureBridges & ViaductsMan-Made FeaturesRoads & Vehicles
 
Marker detail: Cape Creek Bridge and tunnel under construction c1931 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
4. Marker detail: Cape Creek Bridge and tunnel under construction c1931
Cape Creek Tunnel (<i>south portal; as viewed from Oregon Coast Highway</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
5. Cape Creek Tunnel (south portal; as viewed from Oregon Coast Highway)
Technology Spans Marker (<i>wide view; Cape Creek Bridge in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
6. Technology Spans Marker (wide view; Cape Creek Bridge in background)
Cape Creek Bridge (<i>west side of bridge as viewed from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
7. Cape Creek Bridge (west side of bridge as viewed from marker)
Cape Creek Bridge (east side of bridge as viewed en route to marker) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2015
8. Cape Creek Bridge (east side of bridge as viewed en route to marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4. submitted on January 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   5. submitted on January 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   6, 7. submitted on January 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   8. submitted on January 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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