Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lewes in Sussex County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tapping the Power of Wind Energy in Coastal Delaware

 
 
Tapping the Power of Wind Energy in Coastal Delaware Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 3, 2018
1. Tapping the Power of Wind Energy in Coastal Delaware Marker
Inscription.
The University of Delaware's 2-megawatt wind turbine generates clean power and represents an important contribution to renewable energy development in the United States.

Clean Energy
Using wind power reduces our use of fossil fuels, which can produce several pollutants when burned to generate electricity. As a result, wind energy helps to maintain a clean environment and protect human health.

This turbine provides pollution-free electricity for the university's entire Hugh R. Sharp Campus. A typical turbine of this size can power about 500 average homes.

Local Benefits
At times, the turbine generates more than enough power for the campus, which houses UD's College for Earth, Ocean, and Environment. When that happens, the excess power is fed to the City of Lewes' electric grid at wholesale cost. There is no additional cost to Lewes consumers for this clean energy.

Research
In addition to providing clean energy, the turbine allows researchers and students to study corrosion from salt spray, wildlife impacts, and other science, engineering, and policy issues related to renewable energy. These studies help lay the foundation for offshore wind turbines in U.S. waters.

Anemometer - detects wind speed and direction for operating
Tapping the Power of Wind Energy in Coastal Delaware Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 3, 2018
2. Tapping the Power of Wind Energy in Coastal Delaware Marker
nacelle

Gearbox and generator - convert mechanical energy into electricity

Blades - rotate in response to the wind and are attached to the rotor hub; rotor is programmed to operate at wind speeds between 8 and 56 mph

Rotor hub - connected to a gearbox and generator inside the nacelle

Nacelle - houses the mechanical and electrical components of the turbine; sits on a rotating axis that allows it to spin and face the direction of the wind

Tower - used to elevate the nacelle, hub, and blades to reach stronger winds

Turbine facts
Model: Gamesa G90
Tower height: 256 feet
Blade length: 144 feet
Total weight: 310 tons
Blade material: epoxy reinforced with carbon and glass fibers
Speed: 9-19 revolutions per minute
Component construction: tower and blades were manufactured and nacelle was assembled in the United States
Commission Date: June 11, 2010

Visit www.ceoe.udel.edu/LewesTurbine to learn more about the wind turbine.
 
Erected by University of Delaware; Gamesa; The City of Lewes, Delaware.
 
Location. 38° 47.085′ N, 75° 9.793′ W. Marker is
Tapping the Power of Wind Energy in Coastal Delaware Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 3, 2018
3. Tapping the Power of Wind Energy in Coastal Delaware Marker
in Lewes, Delaware, in Sussex County. Marker is on Park Road south of Pilottown Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lewes DE 19958, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lewes Maritime History Trail (approx. 0.2 miles away); The De Vries Monument (approx. mile away); deVries Monument (approx. mile away); Home of Major Henry Fisher (approx. 0.4 miles away); Maull House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Harbeson Railroad Station Privy (approx. 1.2 miles away); Frederick E. Hudson (approx. 1.2 miles away); Thompson Country Store (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lewes.
 
Also see . . .  UD's Wind Turbine. (Submitted on February 3, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.)
 
Categories. EducationEnvironmentScience & Medicine
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 3, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 158 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 3, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement