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Bethlehem in Northampton County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Flow Of Goods & Money

Bethlehem At The Crossroads

 
 
The Flow Of Goods & Money Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2017
1. The Flow Of Goods & Money Marker
Inscription.

How did a small city in the Lehigh Valley become home to one of America's largest steel producers? In the early decades of the company, Bethlehem's location near major cities, raw materials, and transportation routes positioned it for success.

The Lehigh Canal
was completed in 1829. It turned the shallow, rocky Lehigh River into a busy, two-way mule-powered shipping route. Anthracite coal, delivered from the mines of northeast Pennsylvania made it possible to produce large quantities of iron in the United States for the first time.

The coming of the Lehigh Valley Railroad in the 1850s, and the rail lines it connected, created huge demand for iron, then later, steel rails. The railroads made long-distance shipping an economic reality by providing easy access to the ports of Philadelphia and New York and ensuring finished products could be brought to distant markets.

Coal, Ore, & Cheap Labor
were the ingredients for Bethlehem's early success in the steel business. The railroad brought in raw materials and carried away the company's products. A huge influx of immigrants from Europe provided a steady supply of cheap labor.

[Image captions, from left to right, read]
A 1908 drawing of Bethlehem Steel by Richard Rummel, near the Lehigh River and railroad tracks.

The Flow Of Goods & Money Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2017
2. The Flow Of Goods & Money Marker
Coal miners from Wyoming Valley, PA.

Bethlehem is approximately 80 miles from New York City and 60 miles from Philadelphia. In the late 1800s, travel to either city by train would take only a few hours.
 
Erected by SteelStacks. (Marker Number 18.)
 
Location. 40° 36.905′ N, 75° 21.899′ W. Marker is in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in Northampton County. Touch for map. Marker is on the Hoover-Mason Trestle at SteelStacks. Marker is at or near this postal address: 711 East 1st Street, Bethlehem PA 18015, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Why Did Bethlehem Close? (a few steps from this marker); Non-Native Plants (a few steps from this marker); Wartime Steel (within shouting distance of this marker); The No. 2 Machine Shop (within shouting distance of this marker); A Changing Landscape (within shouting distance of this marker); Heat Treating (within shouting distance of this marker); One Of The Hardest Jobs In The World (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Legacy of Steel (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bethlehem.
 
Also see . . .
1. Bethlehem Steel: Forging America. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Bethlehem Steel Corporation. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Lehigh Canal. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. National Canal Museum. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
5. Lehigh Valley Railroad History. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
6. History of Anthracite Coal Mining. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
7. Pennsylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
8. What is SteelStacks?. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & StreetcarsWaterways & Vessels

 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 9, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 88 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 9, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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