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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Lewis and Clark Expedition

 
 
Lewis and Clark Expedition Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
1. Lewis and Clark Expedition Marker
Inscription.
In 1804-06, Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led about 40 soldiers and boatmen on an epic journey. President Thomas Jefferson commissioned this "Corps of Discovery" to find a route to the Pacific Ocean through the newly acquired Louisiana territory. Along the way, they mapped the land, recorded its resources, and contacted its native inhabitants.

The landscape has changed since Lewis and Clark explored it: rivers have been dammed, forests cut over, prairies plowed under, and roads built to the horizon. Although remnants of wilderness still exist, imagine this land as Lewis and Clark first saw it two centuries ago.
 
Erected by Erected by Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition marker series.
 
Location. 46° 10.857′ N, 123° 49.128′ W. Marker is in Astoria, Oregon, in Clatsop County. Marker can be reached from Coxcomb Drive 0.7 miles from 15th Street. Touch for map. Marker is located at the west end of the Astoria Column parking lot, at the hilltop end of Coxcomb Drive. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Coxcomb Drive, Astoria OR 97103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
The Lewis and Clark Expedition Marker (<i>wide view; Young's Bay & Columbia River in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
2. The Lewis and Clark Expedition Marker (wide view; Young's Bay & Columbia River in background)
of this marker. "Ocian in view, O! the Joy..." (here, next to this marker); Comcomly / Indian Burial Canoe (a few steps from this marker); Shively - McClure National Register Historic District (approx. 0.4 miles away); Columbia River Bar (approx. 0.6 miles away); Pilot Boat Peacock (approx. 0.6 miles away); Built by Capt. Hiram Brown (approx. 0.6 miles away); Site of Original Settlement of Astoria (approx. 0.6 miles away); Ranald MacDonald (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Astoria.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lewis and Clark Expedition.
No exploration of the Oregon Country has greater historical significance than the Voyage of Discovery led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Historians and geographers judge the Lewis and Clark Expedition, which brought more than thirty overland travelers into the Columbia River Basin in 1805-1806, as the most successful North American land exploration in U.S. history. Officially called the Corps of Volunteers for North West Discovery, the Expedition was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Department of War, with presidential and congressional authorization. (Submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Astoria, Oregon.
Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and the rest of the courageous
Marker detail: Lewis & Clark image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
3. Marker detail: Lewis & Clark
The United States purchased the Louisiana territory – more than 88,000 square miles – from France in 1803. President Jefferson selected Meriwether Lewis to lead an expedition there.

With Jefferson’s permission, Lewis asked his friend and former commanding officer, William Clark to be co-leader. Although opposite in temperament, they worked harmoniously throughtout the two-year journey.
team who, led by Sacagawea, explored what is now present-day Oregon and Washington from October 1805 to May 1806. Although much of the area has been developed, it's likely you'll see some of the same scenery Lewis and Clark saw 200 years ago. Arriving in the Pacific Northwest, Lewis and Clark found a lush countryside rich with possibility. (Submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Lewis and Clark Expedition, 1805-1806.
The closer they got to the Pacific, the more they suffered. This ocean, Clark mused bitterly, was not "pacific" at all, but "tempestuous and horiable." Storms pinned the party against the rugged, windswept northern coast for weeks. Waves slammed into the mouth of the Columbia with such force that some of the party got seasick. Their leather clothes rotted from the continual soakings, their supplies ran low, and they all got heartily sick of salmon. (Submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationNative AmericansNotable PersonsWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker detail: Expedition Map (<i>this area</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
4. Marker detail: Expedition Map (this area)
Arrived at mouth of Columbia River, (below this marker), November 7, 1805
Indian Burial Canoe / Comcomly Monument (<i>view looking south from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 9, 2015
5. Indian Burial Canoe / Comcomly Monument (view looking south from marker)
Young's River (left) and Young's Bay (right) are visible in the background
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Last updated on February 14, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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