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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Blue River in Lane County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Scott Road

 
 
Scott Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2015
1. Scott Road Marker
Inscription.
In 1862 Felix Scott led a crew of 50 men who blazed a trail across the Cascade Mountains following an old Indian trail which skirted lava flows. Scott hoped to use the new route to take supplies to gold fields in Idaho. His trail was difficult for wagon trains, and in 1866 an easier route was found which is now the approximate location of the present state highway across McKenzie Pass. In Scott’s day this area was known as Summit Prairie. Portions of his old trail, found 1,000 ft. north of this point, are still maintained by the U.S. Forest Service and are used by hikers and horsemen.
 
Location. 44° 12.61′ N, 121° 52.567′ W. Marker is in Blue River, Oregon, in Lane County. Marker is on McKenzie Highway (Oregon Route 242) west of Forest Road 260, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located in pull-out on the north side of the highway. Marker is in this post office area: Blue River OR 97413, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pioneer Mailman (approx. 3.2 miles away); Wisely Reasoned (approx. 5.1 miles away); A Fittin' Tribute (approx. 5.1 miles away); Dee Wright Observatory
Scott Road Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2015
2. Scott Road Marker (wide view)
(approx. 5.1 miles away); Old Wagon Road (approx. 5.1 miles away); The Life of a Lake (approx. 14.6 miles away); Time Traveler (approx. 14.6 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Large wooden "Forest Service" style marker, mounted on a stonework pedestal.
 
Also see . . .
1. Deschutes County History.
In 1859 Oregon gained statehood, however Central Oregon remained largely unsettled. Three years later the first real settlers arrived in Central Oregon. Cattle ranchers Felix Scott Jr., Marion Scott, John Craig and Robert Millican brought 900 head of cattle into the region and spent the winter here. They are reputed to be the first white people to do so. (Submitted on February 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. McKenzie Pass.
In 1862, Felix Scott Jr. traveled from the lower McKenzie Valley with some 50 men and 900 cattle over the old Indian trail past Belknap Springs, then up Scott Creek and over the summit to Idaho. His route was known as the Scott Trail. Several of the men with Scott’s party were soon seeking an easier way across the Cascades. "They will change the route so as to avoid some of the worst places on the present trail,” the Oregon State Journal reported on May 14, 1864. “The principal hill—ascending the mountain on this side—will be entirely avoided by the new route.” The new route diverted travelers along Lost Creek, then up Deadhorse Grade toward the summit. (Submitted on February 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable PersonsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 21, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 92 times since then. Last updated on February 20, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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