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Jensen in Uintah County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Jensen (Mau-be) Ferry

 
 
Jensen (Mau-be) Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2013
1. Jensen (Mau-be) Ferry Marker
Inscription.
The first boat (framed together with wooden pegs) used for passengers and baggage was built and operated by Lars Jensen 2 ½ miles downstream from 1881 to 1909. It was replaced by a cable ferry for wagons in 1885, and a larger boat in 1894. This was used until carried away by ice in 1909. Its last service October 5, 1908 was 86 trips by his son Jens, crossing run-away Indians migrating from Uintah Reservation to the Dakotas. The town was named in Honor of Lars Jensen.
Replica, 1/8 size of the last boat, made by Jens Jensen.
Escalante Camp

 
Erected 1937 by Daughters of Utah Pioneers. (Marker Number 26.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of Utah Pioneers marker series.
 
Location. 40° 22.194′ N, 109° 20.157′ W. Marker is in Jensen, Utah, in Uintah County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 40 and South 10500 East, on the left when traveling east on U.S. 40. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pull-out on the north side of the highway, overlooking the Green River. Marker is in this post office area: Jensen UT 84035, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies.
Jensen (Mau-be) Ferry Marker (<i>wide view; replica of ferry boat mounted on top</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2013
2. Jensen (Mau-be) Ferry Marker (wide view; replica of ferry boat mounted on top)
A Fremont Mystery (approx. 8 miles away); A Real Pioneer (approx. 9.3 miles away); Twentieth Century Homestead (approx. 9.3 miles away); Shipped Another 12,000 Hen Fruit by Parcel Post (approx. 11.7 miles away); Where the Dollar has More Cents (approx. 11.7 miles away); Parcel Post Bank (approx. 11.8 miles away); Do Religion and Money Mix? (approx. 11.8 miles away); Cobble Rock Gas Station (approx. 11.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jensen.
 
Also see . . .
1. Danish Immigration and Life In Utah.
The influence of Danes on the development of Utah is mirrored only slightly in official place-names. Elsinore, Sevier County, was named after the Danish town housing the legendary castle of Hamlet. Jensen, Uintah County, took its name from Lars Jensen, who built a ferry on the Green River. Danish nicknames were more common in the nineteenth century; Mantua was nicknamed "Little Copenhagen," and several communities were often called "Little Denmark." (Submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Jensen, Utah.
Jensen was first settled in 1877 and named for Lars Jensen, an early prospector and ferryman. Today its main importance is as the Utah entrance to Dinosaur National Monument. (Submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
Green River (<i>Dinosaur National Monument; north of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2013
3. Green River (Dinosaur National Monument; north of marker)

3. Utah History: Scandinavian Saga.
The Scandinavians gave their names to some places: Jensen, for Lars Jensen, who built the ferry on Green River in 1885; Axtell in Sanpete County, after Axel Einersen; Anderson in Washington County, after Peter Anderson's orchard in 1869; Peterson in Morgan County, for Charles Shreeve Peterson, its bishop; Elsinore in Sevier County, founded in 1874, after the Danish town where Hamlet once stalked a ghost; Widtsoe in Garfield County, for John A. Widtsoe; Lockerby in San Juan after an early resident; Yost in Box Elder County, after Charles Yost in 1880; Swedish Knoll in Sanpete be-cause Niels Anderson herded sheep there; Christianson Canyon in Tooele County, for an early Swedish settler along Deep Creek; Borgeson Canyon, for Anders Borgeson, who built the first molasses mill in Santaquin. (Submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 27, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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