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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
London Borough of Camden in Greater London County, England, United Kingdom
 

The First Birth Control Clinic

 
 
The First Birth Control Clinic Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 18, 2018
1. The First Birth Control Clinic Marker
Inscription.
was opened by
Dr. Marie Stopes
in 1921
at Holloway and
removed here in
1925

 
Location. 51° 31.386′ N, 0° 8.277′ W. Marker is in London Borough of Camden, England, in Greater London County. Marker is on Whitfield Street just south of Grafton Way, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 108 Whitfield Street, London Borough of Camden, England W1T 5BE, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andres Bello (within shouting distance of this marker); Francisco de Miranda (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Francisco de Miranda (within shouting distance of this marker); Sir Charles Eastlake (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); A.W. Hofmann (about 150 meters away); Roger Fry (about 150 meters away); Captain Matthew Flinders, R.N. (about 180 meters away); Virginia Woolf (about 180 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in London Borough of Camden.
 
Regarding The First Birth Control Clinic. The marker refers to the first birth control clinic in the United Kingdom. The first birth control clinic in the United States was opened in 1916 by Margaret Sanger.
The First Birth Control Clinic Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 18, 2018
2. The First Birth Control Clinic Marker - Wide View

 
Also see . . .
1. Marie Stopes (1880 - 1958) (BBC). "Stopes was a campaigner for women's rights and a pioneer in the field of family planning....In 1921, Stopes opened a family planning clinic in Holloway, north London, the first in the country. It offered a free service to married women and also gathered data about contraception. In 1925, the clinic moved to central London and others opened across the country. By 1930, other family planning organisations had been set up and they joined forces with Stopes to form the National Birth Control Council (later the Family Planning Association)." (Submitted on April 5, 2018.) 

2. Marie Stopes (Wikipedia). "Marie Charlotte Carmichael Stopes (15 October 1880 – 2 October 1958) was a British author, palaeobotanist and campaigner for eugenics and women's rights. She made significant contributions to plant palaeontology and coal classification, and was the first female academic on the faculty of the University of Manchester. With her second husband, Humphrey Verdon Roe, Stopes founded the first birth control clinic in Britain. Stopes edited the newsletter Birth Control News, which gave explicit practical advice. Her sex manual Married Love (1918) was controversial and influential, and brought the subject of birth control into wide public discourse. Stopes
<i>Dr. Marie C. Stopes, half-length portrait, seated, facing slightly right</i> image. Click for full size.
Underwood and Underwood (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress), circa 1921
3. Dr. Marie C. Stopes, half-length portrait, seated, facing slightly right
opposed abortion, arguing that the prevention of conception was all that was needed." (Submitted on April 5, 2018.) 
 
Additional keywords. contraception
 
Categories. Science & MedicineWomen
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 5, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 5, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 5, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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