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Caldwell in Sumner County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Ghost Riders of the Chisholm Trail

 
 
Ghost Riders of the Chisholm Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary D. Carter, October 2004
1. Ghost Riders of the Chisholm Trail Marker
Inscription. The silhouette on the bluff to the East, astride the actual Chisholm Trail, was completed in 1995 after hundreds of hours of volunteered labor, land, and donations. The "Ghosts" will forever remind us of the great cattle drives, 1866 - 1887, when millions of Texas longhorn cattle passed here on their way to legendary railheads, like Caldwell, Kansas. So life-like is the scene, observers are certain they have noticed both dust and sounds coming from the bluff area.

The trail, established by Native American tribes and made famous by Jesse Chisholm, helped in the settlement of the Old West by providing a travel and communication link to the Indian Territory, presently Oklahoma. The history of the Chisholm Trail, the Cherokee Strip and early Caldwell can be enjoyed by exploring the many markers like this one located in Caldwell's Historic Cowtown District two miles north and the rest area directly North of this site.
 
Erected 1995 by a group of history-preserving citizens of Caldwell, Kansas.
 
Location. 37° 0.072′ N, 97° 36.48′ W.
Ghost Riders of the Chisholm Trail image. Click for full size.
By Gary D. Carter, October 2004
2. Ghost Riders of the Chisholm Trail
These are the silhouettes referred to in the marker.
Marker is in Caldwell, Kansas, in Sumner County. Marker is on S. Fall Creek Road (U.S. 81), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Caldwell KS 67022, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Caldwell and the Chisholm Trail ( approx. 0.4 miles away); The Grand Opera House ( approx. 2 miles away); The Legend of Mount Lookout / Gunfire Kills Lawman ( approx. 2 miles away); Caldwell "The Border Queen" / On This Site ( approx. 2.1 miles away); Chisholm Trail ( approx. 2.1 miles away); The Stock Exchange Bank ( approx. 2.1 miles away); Chisholm ( approx. 2.1 miles away); The Railroad Influence ( approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Caldwell.
 
More about this marker. Looking from the road towards the east.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia Entry. “On the long trips — up to two months — the cattlemen faced many difficulties. They had to cross major rivers such as the Arkansas and the Red, and innumerable smaller creeks, plus the topographic challenges of canyons, badlands and
Map of the Old Chisholm Cattle Trail image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Wikipedia Commons, 1873
3. Map of the Old Chisholm Cattle Trail
Original in the collection of the Kansas Historical Society. Click on map to zoom in.
low mountain ranges. The weather was less than ideal. In addition to these natural dangers, rustlers and occasional conflicts with Native Americans erupted. The latter demanded that drovers, the trail bosses, pay a toll of 10 cents a head to local tribes for the right to cross Indian lands (Oklahoma at that time was Indian Territory, governed from Fort Smith, Arkansas). The half-wild Texas Longhorn cattle were contrary and prone to stampede with little provocation.” (Submitted on March 1, 2014.) 

2. Along the Chisholm Trail. “Not only cut the critter out of the herd, but when you make your cast with your lasso, that hoss knowed just the right second when to sit down to keep the critter from dragging the hoss, and, if the hoss sat down too soon, there’d be so much slack in the rope the critter’d have leverage to pull with. Then, if the hoss sat down a little late, it’d be just in the act of going down and’d have the least resistance it’d have at any time. You see, that’s the reason the cowpunchers loved their hosses so much when they had one that was a good one. When he had a good hoss, his work was so much easier that it just
Ghost Riders of the Chisholm Trail image. Click for full size.
By Gary D. Carter, October 2004
4. Ghost Riders of the Chisholm Trail
made all the difference in the world.” (Submitted on March 1, 2014.) 

3. The Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum. “Feeding a Hungry Nation After the Civil War a huge market for beef opened in the northeastern United States. In 1867 cattle that could be bought for $4 a head in Texas sold for $40 a head at Eastern packing plants. That year entrepreneur Joseph G. McCoy built a 250-acre stockyard by the Kansas Pacific Railroad’s tracks in Abilene, Kansas and popularized the route of the Chisholm Trail, which ran north from South Texas, crossed the Red River at Red River Station in Montague County, Texas, and followed a wagon road laid out by Indian trader Jesse Chisholm across what is now Oklahoma to Abilene.” (Submitted on March 1, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Notable PlacesRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 20, 2008, by Gary D. Carter of King George, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,506 times since then and 79 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week March 2, 2014. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 20, 2008, by Gary D. Carter of King George, Virginia.   3. submitted on March 1, 2014.   4. submitted on September 20, 2008, by Gary D. Carter of King George, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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