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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Colebrook in Coos County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Coos Trail

 
 
The Coos Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2017
1. The Coos Trail Marker
Inscription.
The Coos Trail was built in 1803 from Colebrook through Dixville Notch along the ancient trail of the Abnaki Indians to Erroll where it met the Coos Road of Maine completed in 1802 from Hallowell on the Kennebec River
Marked by
The New Hampshire Daughters of
The American Revolution
1940

 
Erected 1940 by New Hampshire Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 44° 53.615′ N, 71° 29.164′ W. Marker is in Colebrook, New Hampshire, in Coos County. Marker is on Mohawk Road (New Hampshire Route 26) 0.1 miles east of Abeneki Lane, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is a metal plaque mounted on a large granite boulder. Marker is located a few yards north of the highway at this location. Marker is in this post office area: Colebrook NH 03576, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Metallak (approx. 6.2 miles away); 45th Parallel (approx. 7.6 miles away); a different marker also named 45th Parallel
The Coos Trail Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2017
2. The Coos Trail Marker (wide view)
(approx. 8 miles away); Dixville Notch (approx. 9.2 miles away); Early Settlers (approx. 10.2 miles away); Republic of Indian Stream (approx. 12 miles away); Log Drives (approx. 13 miles away).
 
More about this marker. There are two misspellings on this marker: (1) the Indian tribe name is "Abenaki" not "Abnaki" and (2) "the trail goes to "Errol" not "Erroll".
 
Also see . . .  Abenaki Culture and History.
There were three subdivisions of the Abenaki tribe: the Sokoki (or Sokokis), the Cowasuck (Cowass or Coos), and the Missisquoi (or Mazipskwik.) Up to 75% of Native Americans in New England died of European diseases in the 1500's and 1600's. Dozens of distinct tribes originally lived in this area, but after each disaster the survivors of neighboring villages merged together, and their identities became blurry even in Indian oral history. Since the Abenaki people retreated into Canada to avoid attacks, the British considered them Canadian Indians, but in fact the Abenakis were original natives of New England. (Submitted on April 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 17, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 53 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on April 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2. submitted on April 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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