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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Transatlantic Slave Trade

 
 
The Transatlantic Slave Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 31, 2018
1. The Transatlantic Slave Trade Marker
Inscription. The Transatlantic Slave Trade killed millions of African people. Men, women, and children were kidnapped and taken in chains to the Americas to create wealth for Europeans. For over two centuries, enslaved black people in the United States were bartered, sold, abused exploited, tortured, and confined in involuntary servitude. An ideology of white supremacy allowed courts and political leaders to justify the enslavement of black people even though the Constitution required liberty and justice for all. In the 19th century, the Domestic Slave Trade brought over a million enslaved black people to the American South. After emancipation, more than 90 percent of all African Americans in the United States lived in the South.

Kwame Akoto-Bamfo (b. 1983)
Nkyinkyim Installation, 2018
Concrete

 
Erected 2018 by the Equal Justice Initiative.
 
Location. 32° 22.341′ N, 86° 18.8′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Caroline Street south of Clayton Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 417 Caroline Street, Montgomery AL 36104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
Marker with the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in background. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 31, 2018
2. Marker with the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in background.
of this marker. The National Memorial for Peace and Justice (a few steps from this marker); Racial Inequality in the United States (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Montgomery Racial Segregation on Buses (about 300 feet away); Old Ship A.M.E. Zion Church (about 600 feet away); The Five Points Area: A Unique Blend of Communities in 1965 (about 700 feet away); Kahl Montgomery/Catoma Street Church of Christ (approx. 0.2 miles away); Judge Frank M. Johnson: Judicial Fairness in the Age of Segregation (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rice-Semple-Haardt House (was approx. mile away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  The Britannica on the Transatlantic Slave Trade. (Submitted on May 31, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
African slaves in chains statue next to marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 31, 2018
3. African slaves in chains statue next to marker.
Sculpture by Kwame Akoto-Bamfo.
Marker located at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 31, 2018
4. Marker located at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 31, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 31, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 68 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 31, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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