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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Francis Scott Key Park

 
 
Francis Scott Key Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 10, 2016
1. Francis Scott Key Park Marker
Inscription. A Place With Its Own History.

Before 1620 the area of the Francis Scott Key Park was inhabited by members of the Algonquian, Nacostine, Nacotchatank, Piscatoway and Patawomeke tribes. In 1634 it became part of the English Colony of Maryland.

Beginning in the 18th Century, Falls or M Street (1) was the trail to the Potomac river falls, and Frederick or 34th Street (2) was the access to the west landing of the port of George Town and Hite's Ferry (3) to Virginia. George Washington passed along 34th Street on the way to his first Presidential Inauguration in 1789, and again in 1793 to lay the cornerstone to the U.S. Capitol.

In 1789 this land was added to George Town, an early trading center and major tobacco port. In 1791, the land was included in the 10-mile square designated as the "Nation's Capital." During the late 18th century, the "Court End" of George Town saw the construction of "Gentleman's Houses," some of which are still standing doday.

These included Francis Scott Key's house (4) built c. 1803 and dismantled in 1947; John Mason's house (5) built c. 1794 and his model farm on Analosian (Roosevelt) Island (6); the Forrest-Marbury House (7) built c. 1788; Halcyon House (8) built c 1786; Prospect House (9) built c. 1790; Quality Hill (10) built c. 1799; and Foxhall House (11) built
Closeup of Map Keyed to Inscription Text image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, February 20, 2006
2. Closeup of Map Keyed to Inscription Text
c. 1802. Georgetown University (12) was established in 1789.

The Chesapeake & Ohio Canal (13) was begun in 1828 as a major trade route to and from the West. The now destroyed Aqueduct Bridge (14) carried the Canal to Alexandria, Virginia. The Canal's 1924 demise was the result of river flooding and competition from the railroads.

The Park site became more commercial at the end of the 19th century and homes were replaced by small shops and businesses. Around 1923, all of the buildings were demolished when Key Bridge (15) was built. Archaeological investigations in 1989 and 1992 examined some of the foundations of these buildings and analyzed artifacts from our early history.

The Francis Scott Key Foundation created and built the Star Spangled Banner Monument with private funds and donated it as a gift to the United States from the American people on September 14, 1993.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.289′ N, 77° 4.077′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from the intersection of M Street, N.W. and 34th Street, NW, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. The park is between M Street and the Canal on the east
Francis Scott Key Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, February 20, 2006
3. Francis Scott Key Park Marker
side of the bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Star-Spangled Banner (here, next to this marker); Francis Scott Key (a few steps from this marker); Forrest Marbury House (within shouting distance of this marker); An Industrial Georgetown (within shouting distance of this marker); Prospect House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Francis Scott Key Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 10, 2016
4. Francis Scott Key Park Marker
The three associated markers are found at the eastern end of the park.
Francis Scott Key Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, February 20, 2006
5. Francis Scott Key Bridge
The bridge carries U.S. Route 29 across the Potomac River, connecting Georgetown in D.C. to Rosslyn in Virginia. The C&O Canal is in the foreground. The remains of the Aqueduct Bridge that carried boats across the river can be seen jutting out into the river.
Francis Scott Key Park Namestone image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, February 20, 2006
6. Francis Scott Key Park Namestone
Bust of Francis Scott Key image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, February 20, 2006
7. Bust of Francis Scott Key
Key Mansion image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
8. Key Mansion
Located near this spot, the old Key Mansion was torn down in 1947.
Francis Scott Key Park image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 2, 2013
9. Francis Scott Key Park
The Star-Spanged Banner Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 11, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 23, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 11,549 times since then and 244 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 11, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   2, 3. submitted on February 23, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   4. submitted on September 11, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   5. submitted on February 24, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on February 23, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   8, 9. submitted on April 18, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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