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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Volta Place: A Place in History

 
 
Volta Place: A Place in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, July 21, 2018
1. Volta Place: A Place in History Marker
Inscription.  The first house of worship in Georgetown — a town dominated by Presbyterian Scots — was a log church built in 1769 by a Lutheran congregation where the present Lutheran church now stands (opposite). The Presbyterian Burial Ground, once the resting place of both Revolutionary and Civil War dead, was located in the next block. It is now the busy and beautiful Volta Park, restored by its neighbors and the city in the 1990s and maintained by the Friends of Volta Park.

South of the park is the charmingly restored Pomander Walk, an alley once known as Bell's Court. Named for Alexander Graham Bell, who lived and worked at the west end of Volta Place, the alley's ten tiny dwellings each sheltered two African American families who worked as domestics and laborers. The houses had no running water or electricity. By the late 1940s the families were evicted as part of the city's effort to eliminate substandard housing.

At the west end of Volta Place is the Volta Bureau. It is the headquarters of the Alexander Graham Bell Associated for the Deaf, founded by Bell to promote teaching deaf children to speak. Bell made many scientific
Reverse of Volta Place: A Place in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, July 21, 2018
2. Reverse of Volta Place: A Place in History Marker
inventions, notably the telephone and the phonograph record, but this great passion was helping the deaf. The Bureau was named for the Volta Prize, awarded to Bell by France for scientific achievement in electricity. Helen Keller, the deaf and blind woman who inspired millions turned the sod at the groundbreaking in 1893. Bell's parents lived at 1527 35th Street, and the inventor used the small stucco carriage house behind as a workshop.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Art on Call marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.585′ N, 77° 3.882′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Volta Place Northwest and Wisconsin Avenue Northwest, on the right when traveling east on Volta Place Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3200 Volta Place Northwest, Washington DC 20007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. John's: 200 Years of History (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Presbyterian Congregation in George Town, (about 700 feet away); St. John's Episcopal Church, Georgetown Parish (about 800 feet away); In Memory of Grosvenor Chapman (about 800 feet
Volta Place: A Place in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, July 21, 2018
3. Volta Place: A Place in History Marker
away); Garage (about 800 feet away); South Lawn (about 800 feet away); Colonel Ninian Beall (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1667 Wisconsin Ave. NW (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionScience & Medicine
 
More. Search the internet for Volta Place: A Place in History.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 17, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 21, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 21, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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